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How AI & Data Analytics Is Impacting Indian Legal System

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In a survey conducted by Gurugram-based BML Munjal University (School of Law) in July 2020, it was found that about 42% of lawyers believed that in the next 3 to 5 years as much as 20% of regular, day-to-day legal works could be performed with technologies such as artificial intelligence. The survey also found that about 94% of law practitioners favoured research and analytics as to the most desirable skills in young lawyers. Earlier this year, Chief Justice of India SA Bobde, in no uncertain terms, underlined that the Indian judiciary must equip itself with incorporating artificial intelligence in its system, especially in dealing with document management and cases of repetitive nature. With more industries and professional sectors embracing AI and data analytics, the legal industry, albeit in a limited way, is no exception. According to the 2020 report of the National Judicial Data Grid, over the last decade, 3.7 million cases were pending across various courts in India, including high courts, district and taluka courts.


Top 5 Legal AI Startups That Have Changed The Face Of Indian Legal Sector

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Given how India's public sector is showing a growing interest in artificial intelligence, can legal tech startups keep up and help transform India's judiciary system? Though India has made rapid progress in terms of technology, companies and researchers are yet to utilise the full potential of AI. In fact, a PwC report emphasises that how instead of waiting for technology to reach a level where regulatory intervention becomes necessary, India could be a frontrunner by establishing a legal infrastructure in advance. A slew of Indian legal tech startups are building NLP-based applications and introducing next-gen legal research platforms that help law firms go beyond simple, keyword-based research, thereby making it less time-consuming. Many legal startups are fast rising in AI research capabilities, some of who have their own AI research labs.


Lawyer-bots are shaking up jobs

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Meticulous research, deep study of case law, and intricate argument-building--lawyers have used similar methods to ply their trade for hundreds of years. But they'd better watch out, because artificial intelligence is moving in on the field.


Lawyer-bots are shaking up jobs

#artificialintelligence

Meticulous research, deep study of case law, and intricate argument-building--lawyers have used similar methods to ply their trade for hundreds of years. But they'd better watch out, because artificial intelligence is moving in on the field. As of 2016, there were over 1,300,000 licensed lawyers and 200,000 paralegals in the U.S. Consultancy group McKinsey estimates that 22 percent of a lawyer's job and 35 percent of a law clerk's job can be automated, which means that while humanity won't be completely overtaken, major businesses and career adjustments aren't far off (see "Is Technology About to Decimate White-Collar Work?"). In some cases, they're already here. "If I was the parent of a law student, I would be concerned a bit," says Todd Solomon, a partner at the law firm McDermott Will & Emery, based in Chicago.


Lawyer-bots are shaking up jobs

#artificialintelligence

Meticulous research, deep study of case law, and intricate argument-building--lawyers have used similar methods to ply their trade for hundreds of years. But they'd better watch out, because artificial intelligence is moving in on the field. As of 2016, there were over 1,300,000 licensed lawyers and 200,000 paralegals in the U.S. Consultancy group McKinsey estimates that 22 percent of a lawyer's job and 35 percent of a law clerk's job can be automated, which means that while humanity won't be completely overtaken, major businesses and career adjustments aren't far off (see "Is Technology About to Decimate White-Collar Work?"). In some cases, they're already here. "If I was the parent of a law student, I would be concerned a bit," says Todd Solomon, a partner at the law firm McDermott Will & Emery, based in Chicago.