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United Airlines Scorpion Scare: Flight Delayed After Stinging Insect Found Inside Plane

International Business Times

A United Airlines flight was delayed for hours Thursday evening at George Bush Intercontinental Airport after a scorpion was spotted on board the plane. According to reports, the stinging insect had crawled out from a passenger's clothes. "Houston to Quito flight 1035 returned to the gate after a scorpion reportedly emerged from a customer's clothing," a statement from the airline to local network KPRC2 read. "Paramedics at the gate immediately examined the customer and determined that he had not been stung. The customer declined further medical treatment and, as a precaution, a new aircraft was arranged.


United backlash continues

FOX News

Two weeks after a passenger was forcefully dragged from his seat on a United aircraft, the airline is still facing serious blowback from the incident. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Tribeca Film Festival organizers have decided to stop screening a 30-second spot advertising United's Polaris Business Class before films due to "a wave of comical reactions from audiences." The airline, which continues to provide travel for filmmakers to and from New York City for the prestigious event, has been an official sponsor of Robert De Niro's film festival since 2014. "United is a valued partner of the Tribeca Film Festival, and we are grateful for their continued support of our filmmakers and the arts," festival spokeswoman Tammie Rosen explained. On April 19, the festival's opening night, the United spot debuted before the world premiere of "Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives."


A scorpion stung a man on a United Airlines flight, because United Airlines

Mashable

United Airlines is having the worst week possible. Following the backlash of a man being forcibly removed from a flight, a man on United Airlines flight 1418 from Houston to Calgary was stung by a scorpion after it fell on his head. According to Global News, Calgary residents Richard and Linda Bell were returning from vacation in Mexico last week when the scorpion fell from an overhead bin into Richard's hair. Richard then flung the scorpion onto his plate, and picked it up. That's when it stung him.


Everyone is making the same joke about United Airlines and Pepsi

Mashable

Last week there was the now-infamous Kendall Jenner Pepsi commercial that was withdrawn after the huge backlash it received. This week, though, the spotlight has been firmly fixed on United Airlines. SEE ALSO: United's staff memo makes the internet even angrier--yes, that's possible On Monday, a video showing a passenger being forcibly dragged from his seat on a United flight went viral. The response has been enormous. Hashtags mocking United have been trending on Twitter, Redditors have been digging up old videos of people complaining about United, and talk show hosts like Jimmy Kimmel have weighed in on the fiasco.


Here's a helpful* video on how to defend yourself with jiu-jitsu the next time United Airlines tries to drag you off a plane

Mashable

The recent incident on a United Airlines airplane, in which a passenger was forcibly removed from his seat and dragged out of an over-booked plane, has prompted a reaction from pretty much everyone on the internet. Now, a pair of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belts--brothers Rener and Ryron Gracie--have added their expertise to the mix, posting a video that shows you how to fight off an attacker trying to drag you somewhere by the legs. SEE ALSO: 'Funny or Die' uses United's own commercial to blast the airline The video, while obviously satirical, actually shows real Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) moves which would most definitely work in real life. BJJ focuses on self-defense and ground combat, so a situation in which someone has grabbed you and tries to drag you away somewhere is a very common training scenario in this martial art. In the video, the Gracies jokingly show a couple of self-defense possibilities at your disposal, ranging from taking down your attacker and running away, to putting them to sleep.