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The past two decades have seen the workplace transformed by digital advances. Gone are many traditional structures and practices, replaced with new ways of doing business, designed to support collaboration and digitally-enabled remote and flexible working. As the technology behind AI and robotics becomes more sophisticated, the number of jobs that remain untouched by automation will decrease. "To keep pace, businesses must rethink how they organise work, reinvent jobs, redeploy staff and implement robust plans for the future," says Lynda Gratton, professor of management practice at London Business School (LBS). There are also emerging social trends and shifting demographics to consider.


Thinking ahead: AI and automating corporate ethics London Business School

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The issue of corporate ethics is never far from the business media headlines. Take the troubles embroiling former Nissan chair Carlos Ghosn, or the accounting problems at Patisserie Valerie in the UK, to name just two recent examples. Despite the best intentions and efforts of policymakers, legislators, boards and professional consultants, the corporate scandals keep coming. Now, to further complicate matters, the latest developments in the digital revolution are adding a new dimension to the challenge of ensuring companies and their executives behave responsibly. Ioannis Ioannou, Associate Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at London Business School, and Sam Baker, Monitor Deloitte Partner, suggest that, while the widespread introduction of AI and machine learning technologies can be a force for good, without the right approach there is a risk that the corporate ethics waters become even murkier.


The ethics of artificial intelligence

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Click on time stamps in the transcript to listen to the relevant sections of audio. Michael Chui is a partner of the McKinsey Global Institute and is based in McKinsey's San Francisco office. Chris Wigley is a partner in the London office. Simon London, a member of McKinsey Publishing, is based in McKinsey's Silicon Valley office.


Will creative machines take people's jobs London Business School

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Ed Rex believes we're heading towards a world where artificial intelligence will master creativity. Professor Lynda Gratton explains how people should prepare for it. "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources." This quote is often attributed to Albert Einstein but also to philosopher C.E.M. Joad, among others: a well-hidden source indeed. But the idea behind the phrase raises questions: if creativity is copied, is it original?


Data Science for Business Intelligence London Business School

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Work on your own data science challenge from beginning to end, using world-class theory and searing insights to solve your specific problem. PHASE 1 Connect and engage Pre-programme Take the opportunity to refresh and stretch your data science skills, using a range of online assets. Identify and refine your data challenge using faculty expertise during 1-2-1 conversations. PHASE 2 Learn, apply and challenge 5 days on campus Immerse yourself in a collaborative and energetic learning experience in the heart of London. Learn in a structured environment with high-calibre teaching from world-class faculty to further develop your knowledge in this sphere and apply it to your organisational context and beyond.