Innerexile protector uses microcapsules to automatically repair phone screen scratches

Daily Mail - Science & tech

If you're accident prone, or have children who like to play with your gadgets, chances are your phone is covered in scratches and nicks. While many cases and screen protectors are designed to reduce the amount of damage, a Taiwanese firm has created a range that is not only super durable, it can even'heal' itself. Innerexile's technology uses microcapsules filled with a glue-like liquid that automatically fills in the gaps created by the scratch. Innerexile's screen protector (pictured) uses microcapsules filled with a glue-like liquid that automatically fills in the gaps created by the scratch. It is 0.2mm thick and can withstand scratches from a bronze brush The firm makes screen protectors and cases for the iPhone 6 and 6s range, including the iPhone 6 Plus and 6s Plus.


The BACTERIA that could mean the end of the pothole

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers are developing self-repairing materials to solve the problem of cracks and potholes in roads. Some of the solutions include asphalt with steel fibers that can close small cracks when heat is added, and concrete with special bacteria inside that can fill cracks as they emerge. These solutions could help make driving conditions safer, as poorly maintained roads can contribute up to 14,000 highway fatalities every year. While asphalt is mainly used to build roads because it's easy to apply, it's also porous, a quality which absorbs some road noise, but also makes the material less durable, resulting in cracks and potholes. But Dr Erik Schlangen, a materials scientist at Delft University in the Netherlands, told The Verge that a self-healing asphalt material he's been working on could be a solution to this problem.


The Smart Cities of the Future Are Already Taking Off

#artificialintelligence

By 2040, about two-thirds of the world's population will be concentrated in urban centers. Over the decades ahead, 90 percent of this urban population growth is predicted to flourish across Asia and Africa. Already, 1,000 smart city pilots are under construction or in their final urban planning stages across the globe, driving forward countless visions of the future. As data becomes the gold of the 21st century, centralized databases and hyper-connected infrastructures will enable everything from sentient cities that respond to data inputs in real time to smart public services that revolutionize modern governance. Connecting countless industries--real estate, energy, sensors and networks, and transportation, among others--tomorrow's cities pose no end of creative possibilities and stand to completely transform the human experience.


The Smart Cities of the Future Are Already Taking Off

#artificialintelligence

By 2040, about two-thirds of the world's population will be concentrated in urban centers. Over the decades ahead, 90 percent of this urban population growth is predicted to flourish across Asia and Africa. Already, 1,000 smart city pilots are under construction or in their final urban planning stages across the globe, driving forward countless visions of the future. As data becomes the gold of the 21st century, centralized databases and hyper-connected infrastructures will enable everything from sentient cities that respond to data inputs in real time to smart public services that revolutionize modern governance. Connecting countless industries--real estate, energy, sensors and networks, and transportation, among others--tomorrow's cities pose no end of creative possibilities and stand to completely transform the human experience.


Nanotech making Willy Wonka candy and self healing robots

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Russian author Boris Zhitkov wrote the 1931 short story Microhands, in which the narrator creates miniature hands to carry out intricate surgeries. And while that was nearly 100 years ago, the tale illustrates the real fundamentals of the nanoscience researchers are working on today. Nanoscience is the study of molecules that are one billionth of a metre in size. Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has made millions of mouths water over the years, thanks to the author's vivid descriptions of quirky tastes and inventive sweets. In reality, there aren't chewing gums that taste like a three-course dinner just yet, but food manufacturers have been working on ways to change tastes and textures using molecular tech To put this into perspective, a human hair is between 50,000 and 100,000 nanometres thick.