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U.S. Senators propose facial recognition moratorium for federal government

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Two Democratic U.S. Senators today proposed legislation that requires a moratorium on facial recognition use by federal agencies, government employees, and law enforcement until a Congressional commission can act to recommend guidelines and place limits on use of the technology. The bill, named the Ethical Use of Artificial Intelligence Act, is being introduced today by Senators Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Jeff Merkley (D-OR). It would establish a 13-member Congressional Commission made up of people appointed by the president, members of Congress, federal immigration and law enforcement officers, and privacy and tech experts. Six committee members come from communities most impacted by use of facial recognition. That Commission's goal would be to ensure facial recognition does not produce bias or inaccurate results, stand in the way of law enforcement's efforts to identify missing and exploited children, or "create a constant state of surveillance of individuals in the United States that does not allow for a level of reasonable anonymity."


Automated Facial Recognition Technology (Moratorium and Review) Bill [HL] 2019-20 -- UK Parliament

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First reading took place on 30 October. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords. Second reading - the general debate on all aspects of the Bill - is yet to be scheduled.


Microsoft Wants Rules for Facial Recognition--Just Not These

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In December, Microsoft President Brad Smith urged lawmakers to set rules on facial-recognition technology to prevent a privacy-threatening "race to the bottom." Now the company has joined a legislative fight in its home state against rules it says would be too restrictive. Microsoft is pushing back on a bill sponsored by a bipartisan group of Washington state lawmakers that would ban local and state governments from using facial recognition until certain conditions are met, including a report by the state attorney general certifying that systems in use are equally accurate for people of differing races, skin tones, ethnicities, genders, or age. Microsoft has endorsed a different bipartisan privacy bill, modeled on European data laws. It contains less restrictive facial-recognition rules, which closely mirror Smith's proposals from December.


Microsoft Wants Rules for Facial Recognition--Just Not These

WIRED

In December, Microsoft President Brad Smith urged lawmakers to set rules on facial-recognition technology to prevent a privacy-threatening "race to the bottom." Now the company has joined a legislative fight in its home state against rules it says would be too restrictive. Microsoft is pushing back on a bill sponsored by a bipartisan group of Washington state lawmakers that would ban local and state government from using facial recognition until certain conditions are met, including a report by the state attorney general certifying that systems in use are equally accurate for people of differing races, skin tones, ethnicities, genders, or age. Microsoft has endorsed a different bipartisan privacy bill, modeled on European data laws. It contains less restrictive facial recognition rules, which closely mirror Smith's proposals from December.


Facial recognition regulation is surprisingly bipartisan

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Bipartisanship in modern politics can seem kind of like an unbelievable, mythical creature. But in recent months, as Congress considered regulation of one of the most controversial topics it faces -- how, when, or if to use facial recognition -- we've gotten glimpses of a political unicorn. In two House Oversight and Reform committee hearings last summer, some of the most prominent Republicans and Democrats in the United States Congress joined together in calls for legislative reform. Proponents of regulation ranged from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) to Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH), a frequent Trump supporter on cable news. On Friday, Jordan was also appointed to the House Intelligence Committee to confront witnesses in public presidential impeachment hearings that begin this week.