Purpose built: 5G and the machines that would move the edge

ZDNet

These are phenomena brought about by the actual technology that inspired its existence in the first place -- one which may not have feasible at the time 4G was conceived. There's nothing about 4G which would have disabled its ability to be sped up, even the millimeter-wave system with which gigabit Internet service would be made available in dense, downtown areas. Wireless Transmitter Facilities (WTF) are too costly to maintain, and run too hot. This would eliminate the need for high-speed processors in the base stations and the antennas, and dramatically reduce cooling costs. For many telcos throughout the world, it could make their networks profitable again. The virtualization of wireless networks' Evolved Packet Core (EPC) is already taking place with 4G LTE. There's no single way to do this -- indeed, EPC is a competitive market with a variety of vendors.


What is 5G? Everything you need to know about the new wireless revolution

ZDNet

Video: 5G: Is all the hype deserved? It is the fourth time in history that the world's telecommunications providers (the telcos) have acknowledged the need for a complete overhaul of their wireless infrastructure. This is why the ever-increasing array of technologies, listed by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) as "Release 15" and "Release 16" of their standards for wireless telecom, is called 5G. It is an effort to create a sustainable industry around the wireless consumption of data for all the world's telcos. One key goal of 5G is to dramatically improve quality of service, and extend that quality over a broader geographic area, in order for the wireless industry to remain competitive against the onset of gigabit fiber service coupled with Wi-Fi.


Over the edge: 5G and the internet of very different things

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When you hear the bountiful promises of internet of things so poetically uttered by its prospective vendors, like the nice half of a pharmaceutical commercial, your brain is probably receiving two implicit messages. One is that connectivity is a virtue unto itself, like consciousness or the acquisition of a new sense. The other is that connectivity would render devices "smart." "I think we are going to be surrounded by smart devices," Internet Protocol co-inventor Vint Cerf told a Google-sponsored startups conference four years ago. "There's something really magic, to be able to assume that any device you have that has some programmability in it could be part of a communications network, and could communicate with any other random, programmable device." A study of any technology over the span of history, for as long as humans have been building machines, will demonstrate quite clearly that it tends to lose its sense of magic, or nirvana, in its implementation. The one quality that 4G wireless had five years ago that it lacks today is that certain "something really magic." What is never so obvious at the outset of a platform's or a system's adoption is that the shedding of false attire is for the better.


What is 5G? All you need to know about the next generation of wireless technology

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Last September, consumers began to see the first service bundles offered by telecommunications companies in their area, marketed with some form of the term "5G." "5G is here," declared Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg, specifically for cities such as Sacramento, Los Angeles, and Indianapolis where rival AT&T had already been drumming up excitement around its 5G trials. It was a bit like SpaceX's 2016 announcement, its 2017 announcement, and its 2018 announcement that the race to Mars had begun. Overlooked by London's skyscrapers EE's 5G mobile trial kicks off. Today, 3GPP specifies which technologies constitute 5G Wireless and, by exclusion, which do not. One key goal of 5G is to dramatically improve quality of service, and extend that quality over a broader geographic area, in order for the wireless industry to remain competitive against the onset of gigabit fiber service coupled with Wi-Fi. The 5G transition plan, once complete, would constitute an overhaul of communications infrastructure unlike any other in history.


What is SDN? How software-defined networking changed everything

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The phrase software-defined networking (SDN) was coined when it was necessary to distinguish the concept from the hardware-based variety. Since that time, "SDN" has come to mean the type of dynamic configuration that takes place whenever software-based services in a data center network are made accessible through an Internet Protocol (IP) address. More to the point, SDN is networking now. In the broadest sense, any software that manages a network of dynamically assigned addresses -- addresses which represent services provided or functions performed -- is utilizing some variety of SDN. The web gave rise to the idea of addressing a function by way of a name that resolves (represents, as in a directory) to an IP address. Originally, the web was intended to be a system for addressing content in this way, but engineers soon saw how efficient an evolved form of that system could be in addressing functionality.