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Honda recalls 137,000 SUVs in U.S., South Korea and Canada over sudden air bag deployments

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON - Honda Motor Co. said Wednesday it is recalling 137,000 new sport utility vehicles, or SUVs, following reports of three injuries tied to sudden air bag deployments in the United States. The automaker said it is recalling the 2019 CR-V to replace steering wheel wire harnesses and supplemental restraint system cable reels, after six unexpected driver air bag deployments that occurred without crashes. There are so far no reports of related crashes, the automaker said. The recall includes 118,000 vehicles in the United States and 19,000 in South Korea and Canada. Metal burrs on the interior surface of the steering wheel may result in damage that could lead to a short circuit and overheating of components, Honda said.


Wi-Fi 6 and 5G for IoT mean fewer barriers to deployment

#artificialintelligence

If we look at IoT in evolutionary terms, Wi-Fi 6 is the clear winner. Today, the majority of IoT devices connect to Wi-Fi or an IoT-specific protocol designed for local ranges only, because the majority of IoT is deployed within a facility where Wi-Fi coverage is practical. Within large facilities with high device density, a single hub can support more connections and its lower latency can improve the control loop performance of feedback from sensor to response. Where Wi-Fi 6 starts to show some limitations is in its restricted range per hub. Covering a home or office might require a single hub, but a large factory or warehouse could require a dozen or more.


Walt Disney World plans to deploy driverless shuttles at Florida theme parks

Los Angeles Times

Walt Disney World in Florida appears poised to launch the highest-profile commercial deployment of driverless passenger vehicles to date, testing a fleet of driverless shuttles that could cart passengers through parking lots and around its theme parks. According to sources with direct knowledge of Disney's plans, the company is in late-stage negotiation with at least two manufacturers of autonomous shuttles – Local Motors, based in Phoenix, and Navya, based in Paris. It's unclear whether contracts would go to both or just one of the companies. The sources, who asked not be identified to avoid offending Disney, said the company plans a pilot program later this year to transport employees in the electric-drive robot vehicles. If that goes well, they said, the shuttles would begin transporting park visitors sometime next year.


Disney's driverless plans not Mickey Mouse

#artificialintelligence

Walt Disney World in Florida appears poised to launch the highest-profile commercial deployment of driverless passenger vehicles to date, testing a fleet of driverless shuttles that could cart passengers through car parks and around its theme parks. According to sources with direct knowledge of Disney's plans, Walt Disney is in late-stage negotiations with at least two manufacturers of autonomous shuttles. The sources, who asked not be identified to avoid offending Disney, said the company plans a pilot program this year to transport employees in the electric-drive robot vehicles. If that goes well, they said, the shuttles would begin transporting park visitors sometime next year. There are no plans for driverless shuttles at Disneyland in Anaheim, according to the sources.


At Amazon, it's a 'hands-off' approach to continuous integration and continuous deployment of software

ZDNet

It's no surprise that Amazon Web Services is way ahead of the world with continuous integration and continuous deployment of software, especially since it advertises itself as a go-to place for organizations seeking to put CI/CD into full practice. The online services giant has taken its own internal CI/CD practices to the next level, however, making it essentially a completely "hands-off" operation. At AWS, changes in microservices are automatically deployed to production "multiple times a day by continuous deployment pipelines," according to Clare Liguori, a principal software engineer at AWS. This pipeline-centered strategy is key to its ability to keep pumping out code. In a recent post, she explains how Amazon moves software through its phases rapidly and automatically.