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How artificial intelligence can transform psychiatry

#artificialintelligence

Thanks to advances in artificial intelligence, computers can now assist doctors in diagnosing disease and help monitor patient vital signs from hundreds of miles away. Now, CU Boulder researchers are working to apply machine learning to psychiatry, with a speech-based mobile app that can categorize a patient's mental health status as well as or better than a human can. "We are not in any way trying to replace clinicians," says Peter Foltz, a research professor at the Institute of Cognitive Science and co-author of a new paper in Schizophrenia Bulletin that lays out the promise and potential pitfalls of AI in psychiatry. "But we do believe we can create tools that will allow them to better monitor their patients." Nearly one in five U.S. adults lives with a mental illness, many in remote areas where access to psychiatrists or psychologists is scarce.


How artificial intelligence can transform psychiatry

#artificialintelligence

IMAGE: Peter Foltz, a research professor at the University of Colorado Boulder Institute of Cognitive Science, has developed an app that rates mental help based on speech cues. Thanks to advances in artificial intelligence, computers can now assist doctors in diagnosing disease and help monitor patient vital signs from hundreds of miles away. Now, CU Boulder researchers are working to apply machine learning to psychiatry, with a speech-based mobile app that can categorize a patient's mental health status as well as or better than a human can. "We are not in any way trying to replace clinicians," says Peter Foltz, a research professor at the Institute of Cognitive Science and co-author of a new paper in Schizophrenia Bulletin that lays out the promise and potential pitfalls of AI in psychiatry. "But we do believe we can create tools that will allow them to better monitor their patients."


Want to know your mental health status? There's an app for that

#artificialintelligence

Thanks to advances in artificial intelligence, computers can now assist doctors in diagnosing disease and help monitor patient sleep patterns and vital signs from hundreds of miles away. Now, CU Boulder researchers are working to apply machine learning to psychiatry, with a speech-based mobile app that can categorize a patient's mental health status as well as or better than a human can. "We are not in any way trying to replace clinicians," says Peter Foltz, a research professor at the Institute of Cognitive Science and co-author of a new paper in Schizophrenia Bulletin that lays out the promise and potential pitfalls of AI in psychiatry. "But we do believe we can create tools that will allow them to better monitor their patients." Nearly one in five U.S. adults lives with a mental illness, many in remote areas where access to psychiatrists or psychologists is scarce.


AI in psychiatry: detecting mental illness with artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

A team of researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder are working to apply machine learning artificial intelligence (AI) in psychiatry, with a speech-based mobile app that can categorise a patient's mental health status as well as, or better than, a human can. The university research paper has been published in Schizophrenia Bulletin, and lays out the promise and potential pitfalls of AI in psychiatry. Peter Foltz, a research professor at the Institute of Cognitive Science and co-author of the paper, said: "We are not in any way trying to replace clinicians, but we do believe we can create tools that will allow them to better monitor their patients." In Europe, the WHO estimated that 44.3 million people suffer with depression and 37.3 million suffer with anxiety. Diagnosis of mental health disorders are based on an age-old method that can be subjective and unreliable, notes paper co-author Brita Elvevåg, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Tromsø, Norway.


How Machine Learning Could Transform Psychiatry

#artificialintelligence

Researchers from the University of Colorado at Boulder are working to apply machine learning to psychiatry, with a speech-based mobile app that can categorize a patient's mental health status as well as or better than a human can. "We are not in any way trying to replace clinicians. But we do believe we can create tools that will allow them to better monitor their patients," Thanks to advances in artificial intelligence, computers can now assist doctors in diagnosing disease and help monitor patient vital signs from hundreds of miles away. Nearly one in five U.S. adults lives with a mental illness, many in remote areas where access to psychiatrists or psychologists is scarce. Others can't afford to see a clinician frequently, don't have time, or can't get in to see one.