Infusing Machines with Intelligence - Part 1

#artificialintelligence

"Learning", "thinking", "intelligence", even "cognition"… Such words were once reserved for humans (and to a lesser extent, other highly complex animals), but have now seemingly been extended to a "species" of machines, machines infused with artificial intelligence or "AI". In October 2015, a computer program developed by Google DeepMind, named AlphaGo, defeated the incumbent European champion at the complex ancient Chinese board game of Go. In March 2016, AlphaGo went on to defeat the world champion, Lee Sedol. This seminal moment caught the world's attention, the media have since been incessantly covering every AI-related story, and companies from all walks of life have since been on a mission to add "artificial intelligence" to their business description. At Platinum we have been closely following the major technological trends for many years.


Behind the Google brain: is AI a kind of technology, or strategy?

#artificialintelligence

On March 2016, AlphaGo, a computer program developed by Google DeepMind, played the board game Go against Lee Sedol, the most famous Korean Go player. It beat Lee in a five-game match with a final score of 4 games to 1. The success of AlphaGo has shocked the whole world. Meanwhile, the development of artificial intelligence technology (also known as AI) has come back on table again. Based on deep learning, AlphaGo has conquered the obstacle of board game, so the next step, as people concern, does that mean AI is heading to a level of manufactural industry that machines can take over human's life?


Understanding the differences between AI, machine learning, and deep learning - TechRepublic

#artificialintelligence

With huge strides in AI--from advances in the driverless vehicle realm, to mastering games such as poker and Go, to automating customer service interactions--this advanced technology is poised to revolutionize businesses. But the terms AI, machine learning, and deep learning are often used haphazardly and interchangeably, when there are key differences between each type of technology. Here's a guide to the differences between these three tools to help you master machine intelligence. SEE: Inside Amazon's clickworker platform: How half a million people are being paid pennies to train AI (PDF download) (TechRepublic) AI is the broadest way to think about advanced, computer intelligence. In 1956 at the Dartmouth Artificial Intelligence Conference, the technology was described as such: "Every aspect of learning or any other feature of intelligence can in principle be so precisely described that a machine can be made to simulate it."


The AI fight is escalating: This is the IT giants' next move

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is where the competition is in IT, with Microsoft and Google both parading powerful, always-available AI tools for the enterprise at their respective developer conferences, Build and I/O, in May. It's not just about work: AI software can now play chess, go, and some retro video games better than any human -- and even drive a car better than many of us. These superhuman performances, albeit in narrow fields, are all possible thanks to the application of decades of AI research -- research that is increasingly, as at Build and I/O, making it out of the lab and into the real world. Alexa and Samsung Electronics' Bixby may offer less-than-superhuman performance, but they also require vastly less power than a supercomputer to run. Businesses can dabble on the edges of these, for example developing Alexa "skills" that allow Amazon Echo owners to interact with a company without having to dial its call center, or jump right in, using the various cloud-based speech recognition and text-to-speech "-as-a-service" offerings to develop full-fledged automated call centers of their own.


The AI fight is escalating: This is the IT giants' next move

PCWorld

Artificial intelligence is where the competition is in IT, with Microsoft and Google both parading powerful, always-available AI tools for the enterprise at their respective developer conferences, Build and I/O, in May. It's not just about work: AI software can now play chess, go, and some retro video games better than any human -- and even drive a car better than many of us. These superhuman performances, albeit in narrow fields, are all possible thanks to the application of decades of AI research -- research that is increasingly, as at Build and I/O, making it out of the lab and into the real world. Alexa and Samsung Electronics' Bixby may offer less-than-superhuman performance, but they also require vastly less power than a supercomputer to run. Businesses can dabble on the edges of these, for example developing Alexa "skills" that allow Amazon Echo owners to interact with a company without having to dial its call center, or jump right in, using the various cloud-based speech recognition and text-to-speech "-as-a-service" offerings to develop full-fledged automated call centers of their own.