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A.I. Could Be a Firefighter's 'Guardian Angel'

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Firefighters have only their wits and five senses to rely on inside a burning building. But research developed in part by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, may change that, introducing artificial intelligence (AI) that could collect data on temperatures, gases and other danger signals and guide a team of first responders safely through the flames. AUDREY, the Assistant for Understanding Data through Reasoning, Extraction, and sYnthesis, has received the Undersecretary's Award for Collaboration from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in recognition of its joint development by JPL and DHS. It's part of the Next Generation First Responder (NGFR) program, a DHS initiative to innovate new ways to keep firefighters, police, paramedics and other first responders safe in the field through increased awareness of their surroundings and communication abilities. But the big picture is even more exciting: AUDREY can track an entire team of firefighters, sending relevant signals to individuals while helping to make recommendations for how they could work together.


Artificial Intelligence may become a Firefighter's Best Friend

#artificialintelligence

But research developed in part by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, may change that, introducing artificial intelligence (AI) that could collect data on temperatures, gases and other danger signals and guide a team of first responders safely through the flames. AUDREY, the Assistant for Understanding Data through Reasoning, Extraction, and sYnthesis, has received the Undersecretary's Award for Collaboration from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in recognition of its joint development by JPL and DHS. It's part of the Next Generation First Responder (NGFR) program, a DHS initiative to innovate new ways to keep firefighters, police, paramedics and other first responders safe in the field through increased awareness of their surroundings and communication abilities. But the big picture is even more exciting: AUDREY can track an entire team of firefighters, sending relevant signals to individuals while helping to make recommendations for how they could work together. "As a firefighter moves through an environment, AUDREY could send alerts through a mobile device or head-mounted display," said Mark James of JPL, lead scientist for the AUDREY project.


NASA Develops Artificial Intelligence to Enhance Firefighter Safety Firefighter Nation

#artificialintelligence

Pasadena, CA - Firefighters have only their wits and five senses to rely on inside a burning building. But research developed in part by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, may change that, introducing artificial intelligence (AI) that could collect data on temperatures, gases and other danger signals and guide a team of first responders safely through the flames. AUDREY, the Assistant for Understanding Data through Reasoning, Extraction, and sYnthesis, has received the Undersecretary's Award for Collaboration from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in recognition of its joint development by JPL and DHS. It's part of the Next Generation First Responder (NGFR) program, a DHS initiative to innovate new ways to keep firefighters, police, paramedics and other first responders safe in the field through increased awareness of their surroundings and communication abilities. But the big picture is even more exciting: AUDREY can track an entire team of firefighters, sending relevant signals to individuals while helping to make recommendations for how they could work together.


HAeg

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"The information all becomes shareable and then the decision will be made by these kind of guardian angels for each of the firefighters," said Edward Chow, manager of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Civil Program Office and AUDREY program manager. The AI automatically warns a police officer inside to evacuate, while also telling incoming firefighters or hazardous-material teams to address the threat quickly. Those firefighters, police officers and EMTs of the future will carry body-worn sensors, cameras and augmented glasses with heads-up displays. "The proliferation of miniaturized sensors and internet of things devices can make a tremendous impact on first responder safety, connectivity and situational awareness," said John Merrill, Next Generation First Responder program manager for the DHS' Science and Technology Directorate.


Could AI Help to Keep Firefighters Safe? - DZone Big Data

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Much of the discussion around artificial intelligence has been around how many jobs will be lost as a result of automation rather than any discussion about the ways AI will improve our ability to work safely and effectively. A good example of this comes from research undertaken by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory that looked at how AI can be used to collect building data to help keep firefighters safe when they enter an inferno. They developed a system called AUDREY, which stands for Assistant for Understanding Data through Reasoning, Extraction and synthesis, in conjunction with the Department of Homeland Security. AUDREY is capable of tracking the team of firefighters as they enter a building, all the time sending them data that is personalized to their location in the facility. It is even capable of giving them recommendations on where and what to do next.