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Historic U.S.-Cuba cruise could be delayed over ticket sales to Cuban-born Americans

Los Angeles Times

Carnival Corp.'s new Fathom cruise brand has hit a bit of rough water. The company is poised to make history May 1 as the first cruise company in more than half a century to sail from the U.S. to Cuba. But the cruise line announced Monday that its inaugural people-to-people cruise may be postponed. In a statement, Carnival said it's in talks with the Cuban government to allow U.S. residents and citizens who were born in Cuba to take the Fathom cruise too -- a reversal of the company's prior stance. Cuban law prohibits Cuban-born Americans or Cuban-born U.S. residents to visit the island by sea, though they are allowed to visit on charter flights.


First cruise from a U.S. port to Cuba in decades leaves Miami

Mashable

Passengers set sail on Sunday from Miami on an historic cruise to Cuba, one that took decades of waiting. Carnival Corp.'s 704-passenger Adonia left port at 4:24 p.m., bound for Havana. Carnival's Cuba cruises, operating under its Fathom brand, will visit the ports of Havana, Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba on the seven-day outing. The cruise comes after Cuba loosened its policy banning Cuban-born people from arriving to the country by sea, a rule that threatened to stop the cruises from happening. Restarting the cruises was an important element of a bid by President Barack Obama's administration's to increase tourism to Cuba after the Dec. 17, 2014, decision to restore diplomatic relations and move toward normalization.


The first U.S. passenger cruise to Cuba in 50 years will happen in May

Mashable

Carnival Cruises announced Monday the first U.S. cruise to Cuba in decades will be on May 1, 2016. The cruise company had announced plans to schedule trips to Cuba last year, but has only just received permission from the Cuban government. "We will be the first cruise line from the U.S. in over half a century to sail to Cuba," Carnival Corporation CEO Arnold Donald said. "This is a historic opportunity, and we know there is pent-up demand amongst Americans who want to experience Cuba." In Cuba, the cruises will stop at three ports, in Havana, Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba.


Cuba relents, allows Cuban-born travelers on historic cruise

U.S. News

Cuba has loosened a policy banning Cuban-born people from arriving by sea, allowing Carnival Corp. to go forward with the first U.S. cruise to the island in a half-century, the Cuban government and the Miami-based cruise line announced Friday. The company at first barred Cuban-born Americans from buying tickets for the planned May 1 cruise to comply with Cuba's ban, drawing complaints from the Cuban-American community in Miami and a discrimination lawsuit. Then, the company said it would sell tickets to Cuban-Americans but hold the cruise only if Cuba relented and changed its policy. Early Friday, Cuban state media announced the loosening of the maritime ban, and Carnival CEO Arnold Donald said in a statement that the trip would go forward May 1 from Miami. The 704-passenger Adonia of Carnival's Fathom brand is scheduled to make the initial seven-day trip, with future cruises planned every other week.


Liner leaves Miami on first such tourist cruise to Cuba in over half century

The Japan Times

MIAMI – Passengers set sail on Sunday from Miami on a historic cruise to Cuba, one that took decades of waiting. Carnival Corp.'s 704-passenger Adonia left port at 4:24 p.m., bound for Havana. Carnival's Cuba cruises, operating under its Fathom brand, will visit the ports of Havana, Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba on the seven-day outing. The cruise comes after Cuba loosened its policy banning Cuban-born people from arriving to the country by sea, a rule that threatened to stop the cruises from happening. Restarting the cruises was an important element of a bid by President Barack Obama's administration's to increase tourism to Cuba after the Dec. 17, 2014, decision to restore diplomatic relations and move toward normalization.