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Train to be a skilled cyber security pro in 2022 for just $20

PCWorld

With security breaches happening more often, there's an increased need for skilled cyber security professionals. And the income potential is lucrative, especially for people who have a knack for it. Then get started on your training with The 2022 Masters in Cyber Security Certification Bundle, just $20 during our New Year, New You sale. The 2022 Masters in Cyber Security Certification Bundle features nine courses that prepare students for an entry-level career. They'll learn ethical hacking techniques, penetration testing, and even learn how to navigate a job interview.


User :: Blog

#artificialintelligence

Here is the cold hard truth about Cyber Security in today's world. It is a fact that most organizations are not prepared for the Cyber Security threats that may disrupt their everyday operations. Organization's have rapidly transformed their infrastructure into a cloud-based model where their data is not only spread over disparate geographic locations, but this sensitive data may be replicated and stored at multiple cloud vendors. In this environment, Identity & Access Management (IAM) and Threat Detection & Response (TDR) are a challenge as the current set of controls are insufficient to manage and mitigate an organization's risk profile. In this environment, Artificial Intelligence can go a long way in helping Cyber Security professionals protect and secure organization data.


Cyber Security Means Nothing Without Cyber Resilience

@machinelearnbot

Cyber security is very important, but to be sufficient alone it would have to be permanently unbreakable. No protection is flawless, and there must be measures in place for what happens when a breach occurs. Cyber security takes care of the before, but where it fails, cyber resilience takes care of the after. TechDigg spoke to Doron Pinhas, an expert in the field and CTO of Continuity Software, to find out more. Historically, resilience was considered an aspect of cyber security as a whole (although coverage of the term in literature was rather limited).


Black Friday security warning: Seven top tips to keep you safe from cyber criminals

ZDNet

Black Friday shoppers have been urged to beware of scams as cyber criminals look to take advantage of one of the busiest online shopping periods of the year. The National Cyber Security Centre -- the cyber security arm of the UK's intelligence agency GCHQ -- has published a series of tips for online shoppers to help stop them falling victim to hackers and other online criminals over the course of Black Friday, Cyber Monday and beyond. Some of the simple security advice being offered by the NCSC include basic online security hygiene: recommendations to keep up-do-date with the latest software patches and security updates, and to secure important accounts with strong passwords and two-factor authentication -- a password manager is also recommended. When it comes to making online purchases, consumers are being urged to'shop smart' and not to click on links in emails and text messages if a deal seems too good to be true. It could be that this is a phishing email, designed to outright steal usernames, passwords and payment details -- or the products on offer by the criminal seller could be cheap bootlegs.


States activate National Guard cyber units for tomorrow's midterm elections

ZDNet

At least three US states have activated and put National Guard cyber-security units on standby for tomorrow's midterm elections. The three states are Washington, Illinois, and, more recently, Wisconsin. According to officials, these cyber-security teams will be prepared to assist state election officials in the event of a cyber-security incident during the elections. Illinois officials have activated National Guard cyber units last month, while Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker did the same on Friday for his state. "Wisconsin voters should feel confident that the Wisconsin National Guard's team is ready if needed to provide assistance on Election Day," said Maj. Gen. Donald Dunbar, adjutant general of the Wisconsin National Guard.