Are We Smart Enough to Control Artificial Intelligence?

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Years ago I had coffee with a friend who ran a startup. He had just turned 40. His father was ill, his back was sore, and he found himself overwhelmed by life. "Don't laugh at me," he said, "but I was counting on the singularity." My friend worked in technology; he'd seen the changes that faster microprocessors and networks had wrought.


Our Fear of Artificial Intelligence

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Years ago I had coffee with a friend who ran a startup. He had just turned 40. His father was ill, his back was sore, and he found himself overwhelmed by life. "Don't laugh at me," he said, "but I was counting on the singularity." My friend worked in technology; he'd seen the changes that faster microprocessors and networks had wrought.


Are We Smart Enough to Control Artificial Intelligence?

#artificialintelligence

Years ago I had coffee with a friend who ran a startup. He had just turned 40. His father was ill, his back was sore, and he found himself overwhelmed by life. "Don't laugh at me," he said, "but I was counting on the singularity."


The Neuroethics Blog: Smarter Artificial Intelligence: A Not So Obvious Choice

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By Shray Ambe This post was written as part of a class assignment from students who took a neuroethics course with Dr. Rommelfanger in Paris of Summer 2016. My name is Shray Ambe and I am a rising senior at Emory University. I am a Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology major who is pursuing a career in the medical field. Outside of the classroom, I am involved in organizing the booth for Emory's Center for The Study of Human Health at the Atlanta Science Festival Expo every year and also enjoy volunteering at the Emory Autism Center and the Radiology Department at Emory University Hospital. At the 2016 Neuroethics Network in Paris, France, bioethicist and philosopher John Harris gave a lecture titled "How Smart Do We Want Machines to Be?" During his lecture, Harris discussed the potential impacts of artificial intelligence (AI) and stated "it doesn't matter how smart they are; obviously the smarter the better."


Essay: When Artificial Intelligence Gets Too Clever by Half

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There's an anthill in the way, but the engineers don't care or even notice; they flood the area anyway, and too bad for the ants. Just as we now have power to dictate the fate of less intelligent beings, so might such computers someday exert life-and-death power over us. Now replace the ants with humans, happily going about their own business, and the engineers with a race of superintelligent computers that happen to have other priorities. Just as we now have power to dictate the fate of less intelligent beings, so might such computers someday exert life-and-death power over us. That's the analogy the superstar physicist Stephen Hawking used in 2015 to describe the mounting perils he sees in the current explosion of artificial intelligence.