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Google Chrome Added a Privacy-Focused Search Engine Called 'DuckDuckGo'

TIME - Tech

As it and other technology giants face questions and fines over their practices when it comes to competition and user privacy, Google is adding a new official option to its popular Chrome browser that allows users to search the web using the privacy-focused DuckDuckGo search engine rather than its own platform. The update to Chromium -- which powers Google Chrome -- axes search engines like AOL and Yahoo!, replacing them with DuckDuckGo (in France, privacy-focused search engine Qwant was also added to the list). More search-savvy users may have already known about the company's DuckDuckGo Chrome extension, which makes DuckDuckGo the default option in the Google browser and protects users from ad-tracking software found on almost every site you visit regularly. The Chrome update means you will no longer need an extension to use DuckDuckGo from your URL bar. If you're unfamiliar, DuckDuckGo is a search engine designed to protect any data generated by your search results and history.


DuckDuckGo search engine increased its traffic by 62% in 2020 as users seek privacy

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

DuckDuckGo, a search engine focused on privacy, increased its average number of daily searches by 62% in 2020 as users seek alternatives to impede data tracking. The search engine, founded in 2008, operated nearly 23.7 billion search queries on their platform in 2020, according to their traffic page. On Jan. 11, DuckDuckGo reached its highest number of search queries in one day, with a total of 102,251,307. DuckDuckGo does not track user searches or share personal data with third-party companies. "People are coming to us because they want more privacy, and it's generally spreading through word-of-mouth," Kamyl Bazbaz, DuckDuckGo vice president of communications, told USA TODAY.


privacy?

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

DuckDuckGo, a search engine focused on privacy, increased its average number of daily searches by 62% in 2020 as users seek alternatives to impede data tracking. The search engine, founded in 2008, operated nearly 23.7 billion search queries on their platform in 2020, according to their traffic page. On Jan. 11, DuckDuckGo reached its highest number of search queries in one day, with a total of 102,251,307. DuckDuckGo does not track user searches or share personal data with third-party companies. "People are coming to us because they want more privacy, and it's generally spreading through word of mouth," Kamyl Bazbaz, DuckDuckGo vice president of communications, told USA TODAY.


Can DuckDuckGo replace Google search while offering better privacy?

The Guardian

So is DuckDuckGo no good? Surprised you did not mention it. Following last week's article about privacy and surveillance capitalism, several readers wrote in about the absence of DuckDuckGo, and it was mentioned a dozen times in the comments. I have suggested this privacy-oriented search engine a few times since 2012, and I think it's worth a go. However, I'm answering Murray's earlier query along the same lines because I can use his email verbatim rather than cobbling together a joint question from multiple sources.


Study Revives Debate About Google's Role in Filter Bubbles

WIRED

Google says a very small percentage of its search results are personalized, a claim that has helped insulate the company from scrutiny over filter bubbles, especially compared with Facebook and YouTube, a Google subsidiary. But a new study from DuckDuckGo, a Google rival, found that users saw very different results when searching for terms such as "gun control," "immigration," and "vaccinations," even after controlling for time and location. One participant saw a National Rifle Association video at the top of the results page for "gun control," another saw Wikipedia at the top, while a third got the NRA video but no result from Wikipedia in any of the first 10 links. The study also found that most users saw roughly similar results whether they were logged in to Google, logged out, or searching in private browsing, also known as Incognito mode. If private browsing on Google were truly anonymous, the study's authors contend, all private browsing results should be the same.