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AI shows how hydrogen becomes a metal inside giant planets

AIHub

Researchers have used a combination of AI and quantum mechanics to reveal how hydrogen gradually turns into a metal in giant planets. Dense metallic hydrogen – a phase of hydrogen which behaves like an electrical conductor – makes up the interior of giant planets, but it is difficult to study and poorly understood. By combining artificial intelligence and quantum mechanics, researchers have found how hydrogen becomes a metal under the extreme pressure conditions of these planets. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, IBM Research and EPFL, used machine learning to mimic the interactions between hydrogen atoms in order to overcome the size and timescale limitations of even the most powerful supercomputers. They found that instead of happening as a sudden, or first-order, transition, the hydrogen changes in a smooth and gradual way. The results are reported in the journal Nature.


AI used to show how hydrogen becomes a metal inside giant planets

#artificialintelligence

Dense metallic hydrogen--a phase of hydrogen which behaves like an electrical conductor--makes up the interior of giant planets, but it is difficult to study and poorly understood. By combining artificial intelligence and quantum mechanics, researchers have found how hydrogen becomes a metal under the extreme pressure conditions of these planets. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, IBM Research and EPFL, used machine learning to mimic the interactions between hydrogen atoms in order to overcome the size and timescale limitations of even the most powerful supercomputers. They found that instead of happening as a sudden, or first-order, transition, the hydrogen changes in a smooth and gradual way. The results are reported in the journal Nature.


Scientists Discover the First Room-Temperature Superconductor

WIRED

A team of physicists in New York has discovered a material that conducts electricity with perfect efficiency at room temperature--a long-sought scientific milestone. The hydrogen, carbon, and sulfur compound operates as a superconductor at up to 59 degrees Fahrenheit, the team reported in Nature. That's more than 50 degrees higher than the previous high-temperature superconductivity record, set last year. Original story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent publication of the Simons Foundation whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research develop ments and trends in mathe matics and the physical and life sciences. "This is the first time we can really claim that room-temperature superconductivity has been found," said Ion Errea, a condensed-matter theorist at the University of the Basque Country in Spain who was not involved in the work.


Has a Harvard team solved the mystery of metallic hydrogen?

Christian Science Monitor | Science

January 27, 2017 --With just one proton and one electron, you'd think there isn't much to learn about the simplest atom in the universe. Yet hydrogen is full of secrets, and a Harvard team says they've cracked one more. Scientists have been chasing hydrogen's elusive metallic form for over 80 years, foiled by the confoundingly high pressures required to create it. Now, researchers have caught the tell-tale glint of metal in their apparatus, according to a paper published Thursday in Science. Experts consider this novel state of hydrogen a "holy grail" of solid state physics for its potentially world-changing applications, from big bang-for-your-buck rocket fuel to ideal electric wires.


Solved? Scientists may have cracked the code of metallic hydrogen

Christian Science Monitor | Science

January 27, 2017 --With just one proton and one electron, you'd think there isn't much to learn about the simplest atom in the universe. Yet hydrogen is full of secrets, and a Harvard team says they've cracked one more. Scientists have been chasing hydrogen's elusive metallic form for over 80 years, foiled by the confoundingly high pressures required to create it. Now, researchers have caught the tell-tale glint of metal in their apparatus, according to a paper published Thursday in Science. Experts consider this novel state of hydrogen a "holy grail" of solid state physics for its potentially world-changing applications, from big bang-for-your-buck rocket fuel to ideal electric wires.