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Democrats, groups seek to challenge Trump's emergency declaration

Al Jazeera

Democrats and rights groups have vowed to fight US President Donald Trump's emergency declaration along the southern border, saying it's an unconstitutional attempt to fund a wall without approval from Congress. A key committee in the US House of Representatives announced on Friday it was launching an immediate investigation into President Donald Trump's national emergency declaration, saying the move to fund his promised wall at the US-Mexico border raised constitutional and statutory issues. In a letter to Trump, Democrats who control the House Judiciary Committee asked the Republican president to make available relevant White House and Justice Department officials. They also requested legal documents on the decision that led to the declaration, setting a deadline of next Friday. "We believe your declaration of an emergency shows a reckless disregard for the separation of powers and your own responsibilities under our constitutional system," said the letter signed by committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler and other top Democrats on the panel.


Senate heads toward rejection of Trump border emergency

FOX News

IN this March 13, 2019, photo, reporters pose questions to Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 13, 2019. The Republican-led Senate is set to deal President Donald Trump a rebuke on his declaration of a national emergency at the Mexican border, with the only remaining question how many GOP senators will join Democrats in defying him. WASHINGTON – The Republican-led Senate is set to deal President Donald Trump a rebuke on his declaration of a national emergency at the Mexican border, with the only remaining question how many GOP senators will join Democrats in defying him. Republicans are predicting that Thursday's showdown vote will result in Congress sending Trump a resolution blocking the border emergency he proclaimed last month to steer an extra $3.6 billion to building border barriers. Since the Democratic-controlled House approved the measure last month, the Senate vote would force Trump to use a veto to protect his presidential campaign's "Build the Wall" mantra over objections from his own party.


Trump was right to veto resolution blocking his national emergency declaration

FOX News

President Trump's veto Friday of a resolution blocking his declaration of a national emergency on the U.S.-Mexico border showed that he understands he wasn't elected to appease career politicians in the Senate. He was elected, in part, to secure the southern border and protect American lives. Despite 12 Republican defections in Thursday's vote to overturn his declaration of a national emergency, the president is standing firm on his promise to build a wall and secure the border. "Congress has the power to pass this resolution. I have the duty to veto it," Trump said in an Oval Office veto-signing event.


White House weighs use of military, other accounts to find cash for border wall

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON - If President Donald Trump declares an emergency to build the wall with Mexico, he still needs money to pay for it. And shifting money from other accounts to deliver the $5.7 billion he wants is not without political problems. The administration has spent months trying to figure out how the president might be able to move forward with the wall -- the central promise of his 2016 campaign -- if Congress refuses to give him the money. As early as last March, Trump was publicly floating the idea of using the military for the task. "Building a great Border Wall, with drugs (poison) and enemy combatants pouring into our Country, is all about National Defense.


Trump expected to seek $8.6 billion for border wall in new budget, setting stage for new showdown in Congress

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON - President Donald Trump will seek $8.6 billion in his new budget to build the U.S.-Mexico border wall, two administration officials said Sunday, setting up another showdown with Congress, which has resisted giving him more money for his signature campaign promise. The request would more than double the $8.1 billion already available to the president after he declared a national emergency at the border in order to circumvent Congress once lawmakers refused his funding demands. That standoff led to a 35-day partial government shutdown, the longest in U.S. history. The officials confirmed that the request was part of Trump's spending blueprint for the 2020 budget year that begins Oct. 1. That document, which sets the stage for negotiations ahead, proposes boosting defense spending to $750 billion while reducing nondefense accounts by 5 percent, with cuts recommended to safety net programs used by many Americans.