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In wake of fatal Tesla crash, BMW is in slow lane to roll out self-driving vehicles

AITopics Original Links

A day after the disclosure of the first death in a crash involving a self-driving vehicle, BMW on Friday announced plans to release a fleet of fully autonomous vehicles by 2021. In a partnership with Intel and Mobileye, the German automaker said its planned iNEXT model won't require a human in the driver's seat. That marks a different course toward self-driving vehicles than Tesla, which offers a self-driving "autopilot" feature to those participating in a "public beta phase" -- though drivers are supposed to stay engaged and keep their hands on the steering wheel. That system was in use during a fatal crash in Florida in May in which a Tesla Model S failed to detect a big-rig in its path and apply the brakes. BMW Chief Executive Harold Krueger addressed the Tesla crash during a news conference in Munich, Germany, on Friday, saying his company is not yet ready to roll out partially or fully autonomous vehicles.


Deadly Tesla crash exposes confusion over automated driving

PBS NewsHour

A Tesla Model S electric vehicle is shown in San Francisco, California, U.S., April 7, 2016. How much do we really know about what so-called self-driving vehicles can and cannot do? The fatal traffic accident involving a Tesla Motors car that crashed while using its Autopilot feature offers a stark reminder that such drivers are in uncharted territory--and of the steep cost of that uncertainty. The sensor systems that enable Tesla's hands-free driving are the result of decades of advances in computer vision and machine learning. Yet the failure of Autopilot -- built into 70,000 Tesla vehicles worldwide since October 2014 -- to help avoid the May 7 collision that killed the car's sole occupant demonstrates how far the technology has to go before fully autonomous vehicles can truly arrive.


Deadly Tesla Crash Exposes Confusion over Automated Driving

AITopics Original Links

How much do we really know about what so-called self-driving vehicles can and cannot do? The fatal traffic accident involving a Tesla Motors car that crashed while using its Autopilot feature offers a stark reminder that such drivers are in uncharted territory--and of the steep cost of that uncertainty. The sensor systems that enable Tesla's hands-free driving are the result of decades of advances in computer vision and machine learning. Yet the failure of Autopilot--built into 70,000 Tesla vehicles worldwide since October 2014--to help avoid the May 7 collision that killed the car's sole occupant demonstrates how far the technology has to go before fully autonomous vehicles can truly arrive. The crash occurred on a Florida highway when an 18-wheel tractor-trailer made a left turn in front of a 2015 Tesla Model S that was in Autopilot mode and the car failed to apply the brakes, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)--which is investigating--said in a preliminary report.


When self-driving cars are coming, for real

#artificialintelligence

Self-driving features have been creeping into automobiles for years, and Tesla (TSLA) even calls its autonomous system "full self-driving." That's hype, not reality: There's still no car on the market that can drive itself under all conditions with no human input. But researchers are getting close, and automotive supplier Mobileye just announced it's deploying a fleet of self-driving prototypes in New York City, to test its technology against hostile drivers, unrepentant jaywalkers, double parkers, omnipresent construction and horse-drawn carriages. The company, a division of Intel (INTC), describes NYC as "one of the world's most challenging driving environments" and says the data from the trial will push full self-driving capability closer to prime time. In an interview, Mobileye CEO Amnon Shashua said fully autonomous cars could be in showrooms by the end of President Biden's first term.


Tesla Motors (TSLA), Mobileye Breakup Not Over Autopilot Safety, Elon Musk's Company Says

International Business Times

Tesla Motors Inc.'s Autopilot has been in the news a lot of late, and not only because of the vehicles crashes involving (or not) the self-driving system or updates to it that would have prevented at least some of those crashes. On Wednesday, Tesla's erstwhile partner in its Autopilot development, Israeli chipmaker Mobileye, said it had decided to split with the Elon Musk-owned company because of concerns over Autopilot, with Tesla "pushing the envelope in terms of safety." Speaking to Reuters, Mobileye Chairman Amnon Shashua said of Autopilot: "It is not designed to cover all possible crash situations in a safe manner. It is a driver assistance system and not a driverless system." In response, a Tesla spokeswoman had initially said the company never advertised its Autopilot as a self-driving technology or its cars as autonomous vehicles.