High-speed 5G network seen as ready to give big boost to online gaming

The Japan Times

CHIBA – Next-generation 5G networking was the big draw at Tokyo Game Show 2019, setting pulses racing with the prospect of a radically more immersive gaming experience. Offering data transmission speeds around 100 times faster than 4G, 5G is expected to enable more seamless imagery with lower latency, more vivid images and sharper motion. Industry experts say it will dramatically improve the quality of augmented and virtual reality games. "It was very smooth, responsive and consistent," said Omar Alshiji, a 23-year-old game designer from Bahrain, after trying out the fighting game "Tekken" at the NTT Docomo Inc. booth at the four-day game show in Chiba. The major mobile carrier installed 5G base stations at its booth this year, making the high-speed network available at the show.


High-speed 5G network seen as ready to give big boost to online gaming

The Japan Times

CHIBA – At this year's Tokyo Game Show, the big draw was next-generation 5G networking -- setting pulses racing with the prospect of a radically more immersive gaming experience. Offering data transmission speeds around 100 times faster than 4G, 5G is expected to enable more seamless imagery -- particularly lower latency, more vivid images -- and sharper motion. Industry experts say it will dramatically improve the quality of augmented and virtual reality games. "It was very smooth, responsive and consistent," said Omar Alshiji, a 23-year-old game designer from Bahrain, after trying out the fighting game Tekken at the NTT Docomo Inc. booth. The major mobile carrier installed 5G base stations at its booth this year, making the high-speed network available at the show.


Google Daydream VR review: Comfy, capable and affordable but not enough content yet

The Independent - Tech

We're drawing towards the end of the year virtual reality went mainstream. There are now several ways you can immerse yourself in all-pervading worlds by plonking a helmet on your head. Great though these are, they are expensive, especially when you factor in the cost of the high-end gaming computer with plenty of grunt, which you need to power the headset effectively. At the bottom end there's Google Cardboard, a makeshift device into which you put your mobile, using that as a screen which has very variable results. In its facilities, JAXA develop satellites and analyse their observation data, train astronauts for utilization in the Japanese Experiment Module'Kibo' of the International Space Station (ISS) and develop launch vehicles 32/39 The robot developed by Seed Solutions sings and dances to the music during the Japan Robot Week 2016 at Tokyo Big Sight.


Japan's 'Superhuman' sports games meld high-tech with athletics and myth

The Japan Times

When it comes to culture and entertainment, Japan has a rich history spanning ancient legends and sports to modern manga and video games. Now a new generation of inventors is drawing on this culture to create sports with a 21st-century twist -- helping players feel "superhuman" through technology or other special equipment. The Superhuman Sports Society, a Tokyo-based group of researchers and game designers, has certified 12 new sports since its launch in 2015, including Hado, or Wave Motion in English. In Hado, players in head-mounted augmented-reality displays and armband sensors dodge waves of light as they fire energy balls at each other in a virtual arena. The game is similar to the action seen in the "Dragon Ball Z" manga-anime franchise and "Street Fighter" video games.


The Pokémon Go Effect: Nintendo Is Now Worth 9 Billion More

The Atlantic - Technology

Based on numbers (and hype) like that, investors immediately took note. Pokémon Go is a partnership between The Pokémon Company, Nintendo, and Niantic Labs (a gaming startup spun off by Google), and while The Pokémon Company is privately held, Nintendo owns a 32 percent stake. On Monday, Nintendo shares surged 25 percent in Tokyo, adding roughly 9 billion of market value to the company--taking its market capitalization to 28 billion. Aside from some hiccups in the gameplay--in Missouri, police reported that armed robbers were using the game to lure people to a parking lot, and in Wyoming, a woman exploring territory not charted in the game stumbled upon a dead body--there have been several heartwarming stories circulating on social media about the game bringing people together in the real world. Pokémon Go's current success has two implications: First, it underscores the potential of augmented reality for the average consumer, who isn't going to buy expensive gaming devices like an Oculus Rift.