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AAAI 1994 Spring Symposium Series Reports

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) held its 1994 Spring Symposium Series on 19-23 March at Stanford University, Stanford, California. This article contains summaries of 10 of the 11 symposia that were conducted: Applications of Computer Vision in Medical Image Processing; AI in Medicine: Interpreting Clinical Data; Believable Agents; Computational Organization Design; Decision-Theoretic Planning; Detecting and Resolving Errors in Manufacturing Systems; Goal-Driven Learning; Intelligent Multimedia, Multimodal Systems; Software Agents; and Toward Physical Interaction and Manipulation. Papers of most of the symposia are available as technical reports from AAAI.


A Report to ARPA on Twenty-First Century Intelligent Systems

AI Magazine

This report stems from an April 1994 meeting, organized by AAAI at the suggestion of Steve Cross and Gio Wiederhold.1 The purpose of the meeting was to assist ARPA in defining an agenda for foundational AI research. Prior to the meeting, the fellows and officers of AAAI, as well as the report committee members, were asked to recommend areas in which major research thrusts could yield significant scientific gain -- with high potential impact on DOD applications -- over the next ten years. At the meeting, these suggestions and their relevance to current national needs and challenges in computing were discussed and debated. An initial draft of this report was circulated to the fellows and officers. The final report has benefited greatly from their comments and from textual revisions contributed by Joseph Halpern, Fernando Pereira, and Dana Nau.


A Report to ARPA on Twenty-First Century Intelligent Systems

AI Magazine

The purpose of the meeting was to assist ARPA in defining an agenda for foundational AI research. Prior to the meeting, the fellows and officers of AAAI, as well as the report committee members, were asked to recommend areas in which major research thrusts could yield significant scientific gain--with high potential impact on DOD applications--over the next ten years. At the meeting, these suggestions and their relevance to current national needs and challenges in computing were discussed and debated. An initial draft of this report was circulated to the fellows and officers. The final report has benefited greatly from their comments and from textual revisions contributed by Joseph Halpern, Fernando Pereira, and Dana Nau. Computer systems are becoming commonplace; indeed, they are almost ubiquitous. We find them central to the functioning of most business, governmental, military, environmental, and healthcare organizations. They are also a part of many educational and training ...


Reports of the AAAI 2010 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-10 Workshop program was held Sunday and Monday, July 11–12, 2010 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia. The AAAI-10 workshop program included 13 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. The titles of the workshops were AI and Fun, Bridging the Gap between Task and Motion Planning, Collaboratively-Built Knowledge Sources and Artificial Intelligence, Goal-Directed Autonomy, Intelligent Security, Interactive Decision Theory and Game Theory, Metacognition for Robust Social Systems, Model Checking and Artificial Intelligence, Neural-Symbolic Learning and Reasoning, Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition, Statistical Relational AI, Visual Representations and Reasoning, and Abstraction, Reformulation, and Approximation. This article presents short summaries of those events.


Reports of the AAAI 2010 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-10 workshop program included 13 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. The titles of the workshops were AI and Fun; Bridging the Gap Between Task and Motion Planning; Collaboratively Built Knowledge Sources and Artificial Intelligence; Goal-Directed Autonomy; Intelligent Security; Interactive Decision Theory and Game Theory; Metacognition for Robust Social Systems; Model Checking and Artificial Intelligence; Neural-Symbolic Learning and Reasoning; Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition; Statistical Relational AI; Visual Representations and Reasoning; and Abstraction, Reformulation, and Approximation. This article presents short summaries of those events. Interactive entertainment has become a dominant force in the entertainment sector of the global economy. In 2000, John Laird and Michael van Lent justified interactive entertainment as a domain of study in AI when they posited that computer games could act as test beds for achieving human-level intelligence in computers, leveraging the fidelity of their simulations of realworld dynamics.