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Artificial intelligence helps researchers up-cycle waste carbon

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IMAGE: Researchers from U of T Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University are using electrolyzers like this one to convert waste CO2 into commercially valuable chemicals. Their latest catalyst, designed in part... view more Researchers at University of Toronto Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University are using artificial intelligence (AI) to accelerate progress in transforming waste carbon into a commercially valuable product with record efficiency. They leveraged AI to speed up the search for the key material in a new catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) into ethylene -- a chemical precursor to a wide range of products, from plastics to dish detergent. The resulting electrocatalyst is the most efficient in its class. If run using wind or solar power, the system also provides an efficient way to store electricity from these renewable but intermittent sources.


Artificial intelligence helps researchers produce record-setting catalyst for carbon dioxide-to-ethylene conversion

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Researchers at University of Toronto Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University are using artificial intelligence (AI) to accelerate progress in transforming waste carbon into a commercially valuable product with record efficiency. They leveraged AI to speed up the search for the key material in a new catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) into ethylene--a chemical precursor to a wide range of products, from plastics to dish detergent. The resulting electrocatalyst is the most efficient in its class. If run using wind or solar power, the system also provides an efficient way to store electricity from these renewable but intermittent sources. "Using clean electricity to convert CO2 into ethylene, which has a $60 billion global market, can improve the economics of both carbon capture and clean energy storage," says Professor Ted Sargent, one of the senior authors on a new paper published today in Nature.


This Lab 'Cooks' With AI to Make New Materials

WIRED

At the University of Toronto, Ted Sargent runs a test kitchen of sorts. His team, composed of researchers and students, develops recipes, measures and mixes ingredients carefully, and then evaluates the aftermath. The concoctions mostly--if not always--turn out to be inedible. Fortunately, though, flavor is not the point. Their goal is to invent recipes to "upgrade" the greenhouse gas into useful materials, says Sargent, an electrical engineer.


Artificial Intelligence Helps Researchers Up-Cycle Waste Carbon With Record Efficiency – IAM Network

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Researchers from U of T Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University are using electrolyzers like this one to convert waste CO2 into commercially valuable chemicals. Their latest catalyst, designed in part through the use of AI, is the most efficient in its class. Credit: Daria Perevezentsev / University of Toronto Engineering Researchers at University of Toronto Engineering and Carnegie Mellon University are using artificial intelligence (AI) to accelerate progress in transforming waste carbon into a commercially valuable product with record efficiency. They leveraged AI to speed up the search for the key material in a new catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) into ethylene -- a chemical precursor to a wide range of products, from plastics to dish detergent. The resulting electrocatalyst is the most efficient in its class.


Researchers seek to revolutionize catalyst design with machine learning Penn State University

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Researchers from Penn State and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) have received a $1.2 million grant from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to use machine learning -- a form of artificial intelligence -- and data science to design more effective catalysts for chemical processing. The grant is part of a new initiative by the DOE to provide $27.6 million in grants for data science research in chemical and materials sciences. A catalyst is a stable chemical substance that, when added to a chemical reaction, increases the rate of reaction without becoming part of the reaction. "It is important to recognize how widespread the use of catalysts is," said Michael Janik, Penn State professor of chemical engineering and principal investigator for the study. "About 90% of chemical products people are using every day, like gasoline and fine chemicals that are in shampoo, are going through some sort of catalytic process before they're used."