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Enabling Deep Learning on IoT Devices

IEEE Computer

Deep learning can enable Internet of Things (IoT) devices to interpret unstructured multimedia data and intelligently react to both user and environmental events but has demanding performance and power requirements. The authors explore two ways to successfully integrate deep learning with low-power IoT products.


There will be 24 billion IoT devices installed on Earth by 2020

@machinelearnbot

By 2020, more than 24 billion internet-connected devices will be installed globally -- that's more than 4 devices for every human on earth. The Internet of Things first came to us on PCs. Then it moved to smartphones, tablets, smartwatches, and TVs. This IoT revolution has the potential to change our homes, transportation, work, even our cities. But how will we arrive in this new era?


Atari's going to build IoT devices that talk over a low-power network

PCWorld

The latest entrant in the Internet of Things is legendary gaming company Atari, which plans to make consumer devices that communicate over the SigFox low-power network. The devices will be for homes, pets, lifestyle, and safety. Over the SigFox network, users will be able to see the location and status of their devices at all times, the companies said. They're set to go into production this year. The Atari brand dates back to the 1970s, when the company introduced the early video game Pong and went on to make a series of popular video games and consoles.


Your insecure Internet of Things devices are putting everyone at risk of attack

ZDNet

Insecure Internet of Things (IoT) devices are potentially putting society as a whole at risk from cyberattacks because cyber criminals are able to exploit these common products that haven't been designed with any form of security in mind. IoT products have become a staple in many homes and places of work because they're perceived as helpful to everyday life. However, many IoT devices get installed onto networks without proper security procedures in place, either because the user isn't aware of how to boost the security of the device – for example, by changing the password – or the device doesn't come with a password or options for securing it at all. In some cases, IoT devices are leaking data onto the internet because the vendor hasn't properly configured security – whether by mistake, or because of a requirement to rush it out to the market without adding security by design. Either way, poor security in IoT devices can have major consequences.


Your insecure Internet of Things devices are putting everyone at risk of attack

#artificialintelligence

Insecure Internet of Things (IoT) devices are potentially putting society as a whole at risk from cyberattacks because cyber criminals are able to exploit these common products that haven't been designed with any form of security in mind. IoT products have become a staple in many homes and places of work because they're perceived as helpful to everyday life. However, many IoT devices get installed onto networks without proper security procedures in place, either because the user isn't aware of how to boost the security of the device – for example, by changing the password – or the device doesn't come with a password or options for securing it at all. In some cases, IoT devices are leaking data onto the internet because the vendor hasn't properly configured security – whether by mistake, or because of a requirement to rush it out to the market without adding security by design. Either way, poor security in IoT devices can have major consequences.