Car park app offers users £10 reward to snitch on people parking illegally

The Independent - Tech

A private parking firm has created an app that promises to pay users to report illegally parked cars. UK Car Park Management's (UK CPM) i-Ticket app, which is available for free on Google Play and the App Store, pays a £10 commission to users who upload a picture of the vehicle and its registration number. The company then uses DVLA data to send a £60 fine to the vehicle owner, a fee that rises to £100 if it isn't paid within two weeks. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar. Japan's On-Art Corp's CEO Kazuya Kanemaru poses with his company's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' and other robots during a demonstration in Tokyo, Japan Japan's On-Art Corp's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' performs during its unveiling in Tokyo, Japan Singulato Motors co-founder and CEO Shen Haiyin poses in his company's concept car Tigercar P0 at a workshop in Beijing, China A picture shows Singulato Motors' concept car Tigercar P0 at a workshop in Beijing, China Connected company president Shigeki Tomoyama addresses a press briefing as he elaborates on Toyota's "connected strategy" in Tokyo.


Traffic lights built into pavement for smartphone-using pedestrians in Netherlands

The Independent - Tech

A town in the Netherlands is trialling special pavement lights designed to help smartphone users cross the road safely. The LED strips have been embedded into the ground at a pedestrian crossing in Bodegraven, close to three schools. The hope is that they'll catch the eye of pedestrians who are too distracted by their smartphones to bother looking at the road, telling them when to cross and when not to cross by either glowing green or red, depending on the traffic light signals. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar. Japan's On-Art Corp's CEO Kazuya Kanemaru poses with his company's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' and other robots during a demonstration in Tokyo, Japan Japan's On-Art Corp's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' performs during its unveiling in Tokyo, Japan Singulato Motors co-founder and CEO Shen Haiyin poses in his company's concept car Tigercar P0 at a workshop in Beijing, China A picture shows Singulato Motors' concept car Tigercar P0 at a workshop in Beijing, China Connected company president Shigeki Tomoyama addresses a press briefing as he elaborates on Toyota's "connected strategy" in Tokyo.


What it's like when your car drives itself – and why we better get used to it

The Independent - Tech

Self-driving cars are on their way to our roads. And they're probably not going to arrive with a bang, but with a quiet little beeping. In one important way, they already have arrived. Tesla is gradually rolling out its Autopilot features – meant not as a fully self-driving car, but as a way of helping people out while they're driving themselves – and has recently announced that it will be moving towards fully autonomous vehicles over the coming years. In its facilities, JAXA develop satellites and analyse their observation data, train astronauts for utilization in the Japanese Experiment Module'Kibo' of the International Space Station (ISS) and develop launch vehicles 32/39 The robot developed by Seed Solutions sings and dances to the music during the Japan Robot Week 2016 at Tokyo Big Sight.


Logitech Zerotouch lets people communicate with their houses by talking to their car

The Independent - Tech

People can finally talk to their houses by shouting at their cars. Amazon and Logitech have announced that they will bring the Alexa voice assistant to the ZeroTouch app. That means that people can set up their phones in their car and use it to talk to the voice assistant without using their hands – and in doing so give instructions to everything from their lights to their heating. Logitech has long sold ZeroTouch, a special mount for people's phones that gives access to a personal assistant that can be used without being touch and so is intended to keep people from being distracted while driving. But the company has now announced that the app will include Amazon's Alexa, a voice assistant that can be used with a wide range of features.


There's a raging talent war for AI experts and its costing automakers millions

#artificialintelligence

The self-driving car space is getting increasingly more cutthroat. The sheer number of lawsuits filed recently are a testament to that. Tesla, for example, is suing its former Autopilot director Sterling Anderson. The lawsuit claims Anderson stole data for a competing venture, Aurora Innovations, that hasn't even come out of stealth mode yet. "In their zeal to play catch-up, traditional automakers have created a get-rich-quick environment.