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'Explainable AI' predicts homelessness in Ontario city - Cities Today - Connecting the world's urban leaders

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The City of London in Canada is implementing an artificial intelligence (AI) tool it has developed internally to predict and prevent homelessness. The Chronic Homelessness Artificial Intelligence (CHAI) model uses machine learning to forecast the probability of an individual in the city's shelter system becoming chronically homeless within the next six months – that is, remaining in the shelter system for more than 180 days in a year. In July, 312 people in London were chronically homeless. The tool was developed in-house with support from a consultant, and could help other cities – particularly those in Canada – deploy similar systems quickly. The CHAI model grew out of London's adoption of the federal Homeless Individuals and Families Information System (HIFIS), which is designed to provide a clearer picture of homelessness in communities and support organisations to work collaboratively.


Interpretable Machine Learning Approaches to Prediction of Chronic Homelessness

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

A 2016 report claims that annually upwards of 235 000 Canadians endure periods of homelessness, with approximately 35 000 individuals lacking a place to stay each night [1]. Between 2005 and 2014, there was a downward trend in the total number of Canadians using shelters; however, the occupancy rates of shelters has been increasing [1]. One factor accounting for this ongoing decrease in the number of homeless individuals paired with an increase in shelter occupancy is an increase in chronic homelessness. London's Homeless Prevention division identifies an individual as chronically homelessness if they have spent 6 or more months ( 180 days) of the last year in a shelter, which was based on the definition of chronic homelessness outlined by the Canadian government's homelessness strategy directives [2]. In addition to this trend, the demographics of homelessness are changing in Canada. In preceding decades, older, single males are over-represented in the homeless population; in contrast, the homeless population of today is increasingly diverse, with families, women, and youth comprising a greater fraction [1].


Hawaii bill would classify homelessness as medical condition, with Medicaid-aided housing as prescription

The Japan Times

HONOLULU – As an emergency room doctor, Hawaii Sen. Josh Green sees homeless patients suffering from diabetes, mental health problems and an array of medical issues that are more difficult to manage when they are homeless or do not have permanent housing. That's why Green says he wants homelessness classified under Hawaii state law as a medical condition. If homelessness is a disease, he reasons, then doctors should be able to write prescriptions for the cure: Housing. "It is paradigm shift for sure, but the single best thing we can do today is to allow physicians and health care providers in general to write prescriptions for housing," Green said. Green last week introduced a bill in the Hawaii Legislature to classify chronic homelessness as a medical condition and require insurance companies to cover treatment of the condition.


Hawaii pols propose bill that would classify homelessness as medical condition

FOX News

HONOLULU – As an emergency room doctor, Hawaii Sen. Josh Green sees homeless patients suffering from diabetes, mental health problems and an array of medical issues that are more difficult to manage when they are homeless or do not have permanent housing. That's why Green says he wants homelessness classified under Hawaii state law as a medical condition. If homelessness is a disease, he reasons, then doctors should be able to write prescriptions for the cure: Housing. "It is paradigm shift for sure, but the single best thing we can do today is to allow physicians and health care providers in general to write prescriptions for housing," Green said. Green last week introduced a bill in the Hawaii Legislature to classify chronic homelessness as a medical condition and require insurance companies to cover treatment of the condition.


Should we give homeless people homes?

BBC News

The Canadian city of Medicine Hat recently became the first city to end homelessness thanks to a surprisingly simple idea: giving every person living on the streets a home with no strings attached. Unlike many other homelessness initiatives, the so-called "Housing First" approach doesn't require homeless people to make steps towards solving other issues like alcoholism, mental health problems or drug addiction before they get accommodation. Four experts talk to the BBC World Service Inquiry programme about how and why the approach works and some of its limitations. Dr Sam Tsemberis is a psychiatrist who founded Pathways to Housing in New York City in 1992, and developed the Housing First model. "In the 1980s I was working at Bellevue Psychiatric Hospital on the east side of Manhattan, and I walked about 30 blocks to work.