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Honda Gets Ready For The 4th Industrial Revolution By Using AI, Big Data And Robots

Forbes - Tech

Although the Japanese company Honda is widely known as one of the largest automobile manufacturers in the world and also the largest manufacturer of motorcycles, it is increasingly on the front edge of technological innovation outside the automotive world. The company's investment in research and development landed it on the "Top 20 R&D Spenders" list that includes five other automakers but representatives from other industries as well. Based upon the innovations Honda has shared publicly, it's using some of this R&D budget to get ready for the 4th industrial revolution by using AI and big data to not only design safer and more personalized autos, but also create robots. With the tremendous amount of data that's created from a wide variety of sources including sensors on cars, customer surveys, smartphones and social media, Honda's research and development team uses data analytics tools to comb through data sets in order to gain insights it can incorporate into future auto designs. As the company's big data maturity has increased, its engineers are learning to work with and leverage data, that had previously been to cumbersome to find meaning, thanks to the assistance of big data technology and analytics tools.


Why 'Autos Plus Tech' Is the Best Path for Automated Vehicles

#artificialintelligence

Neither auto companies nor tech companies can come up with winning mobility offerings on their own. Instead, they will have to work together to create products, services, and business models to meet the needs of users. This article is part of an MIT SMR initiative exploring how technology is reshaping the practice of management. For more than a century, the business of moving people has been dominated by the automobile, with major automakers manufacturing vehicles and selling them to consumers. It has always been a capital-intensive business with extremely low margins.


Apple's Autonomous Driving Vehicle Project Hits the Gas

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Transportation of people, goods, and tools is an automobile's basic or primary function. However, this premise was not sustainable or rather good enough for marketing automobiles to its customers -- it had to be extended. During the last century, automobile manufacturers or OEMs (original equipment manufacturers) captured the imagination of their customers by tapping into their emotions and aspirations -- based on owning vehicles that were fast, well designed, and perhaps status symbols. Some of these vehicles remain as aspirational as they were earlier to this day, only to create a legacy of their own and become costlier with time. Consider a Ford Mustang 1967, for example. This fundamental ground on which the manufacturers thrived, wherein cars became a tad faster with more horsepower added to them, had external design changes, or became luxurious with different interior options, was not disruptive.


Honda Gets Ready For The 4th Industrial Revolution By Using AI, Big Data And Robots

#artificialintelligence

Although the Japanese company Honda is widely known as one of the largest automobile manufacturers in the world and also the largest manufacturer of motorcycles, it is increasingly on the front edge of technological innovation outside the automotive world. The company's investment in research and development landed it on the "Top 20 R&D Spenders" list that includes five other automakers but representatives from other industries as well. Based upon the innovations Honda has shared publicly, it's using some of this R&D budget to get ready for the 4th industrial revolution by using AI and big data to not only design safer and more personalized autos, but also create robots. With the tremendous amount of data that's created from a wide variety of sources including sensors on cars, customer surveys, smartphones and social media, Honda's research and development team uses data analytics tools to comb through data sets in order to gain insights it can incorporate into future auto designs. As the company's big data maturity has increased, its engineers are learning to work with and leverage data, that had previously been to cumbersome to find meaning, thanks to the assistance of big data technology and analytics tools.


Business models will drive the future of autonomous vehicles

#artificialintelligence

S. Somasegar is managing director at Madrona Venture Group and the former head of Microsoft's Developer Division. Daniel Li is an investor with Madrona Venture Group. "The technology is essentially here… We have machines that can make a bunch of quick decisions that could drastically reduce traffic fatalities, drastically improve the efficiency of our transportation grid, and help solve things like carbon emissions that are causing the warming of the planet." Interestingly, this statement didn't come from a futurist like Elon Musk or Mark Zuckerberg or Jeff Bezos; this was President Obama discussing autonomous vehicles in an interview with WIRED last fall. Over the last year, we have seen many groundbreaking announcements regarding autonomous cars, from companies like Ford promoting its autonomous vehicle leader to the position of CEO, to Tesla's NHSTA investigation showing a 40 percent decrease in accidents with Autopilot enabled and Audi beginning mass-market sales of a "Level 3" autonomous car.