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How to raise a genius: lessons from a 45-year study of super-smart children

#artificialintelligence

On a summer day in 1968, professor Julian Stanley met a brilliant but bored 12-year-old named Joseph Bates. The Baltimore student was so far ahead of his classmates in mathematics that his parents had arranged for him to take a computer-science course at Johns Hopkins University, where Stanley taught. Having leapfrogged ahead of the adults in the class, the child kept himself busy by teaching the FORTRAN programming language to graduate students. Unsure of what to do with Bates, his computer instructor introduced him to Stanley, a researcher well known for his work in psychometrics -- the study of cognitive performance. To discover more about the young prodigy's talent, Stanley gave Bates a battery of tests that included the SAT college-admissions exam, normally taken by university-bound 16- to 18-year-olds in the United States. Bates's score was well above the threshold for admission to Johns Hopkins, and prompted Stanley to search for a local high school that would let the child take advanced mathematics and science classes.


How to Raise a Genius: Lessons from a 45-Year Study of Supersmart Children

#artificialintelligence

On a summer day in 1968, professor Julian Stanley met a brilliant but bored 12-year-old named Joseph Bates. The Baltimore student was so far ahead of his classmates in mathematics that his parents had arranged for him to take a computer-science course at Johns Hopkins University, where Stanley taught. Having leapfrogged ahead of the adults in the class, the child kept himself busy by teaching the FORTRAN programming language to graduate students. Unsure of what to do with Bates, his computer instructor introduced him to Stanley, a researcher well known for his work in psychometrics--the study of cognitive performance. To discover more about the young prodigy's talent, Stanley gave Bates a battery of tests that included the SAT college-admissions exam, normally taken by university-bound 16- to 18-year-olds in the United States.


The rise and fall of cognitive skills

AITopics Original Links

Scientists have long known that our ability to think quickly and recall information, also known as fluid intelligence, peaks around age 20 and then begins a slow decline. However, more recent findings, including a new study from neuroscientists at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), suggest that the real picture is much more complex. The study, which appears in the journal Psychological Science, finds that different components of fluid intelligence peak at different ages, some as late as age 40. "At any given age, you're getting better at some things, you're getting worse at some other things, and you're at a plateau at some other things. There's probably not one age at which you're peak on most things, much less all of them," says Joshua Hartshorne, a postdoc in MIT's Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and one of the paper's authors.


Growing old can actually BOOST your brainpower

AITopics Original Links

Like a fine wine, some parts of the human brain can take decades to mature and reach their peak, researchers have found. They say rather than peaking in our twenties, in fact some areas do not reach their full potential until we grow old. In fact, the ability to evaluate other people's emotional states, the peak occurred much later, in the 40s or 50s. The ability to evaluate other people's emotional states does not peak until we are in our 40s or 50s, researchers said. 'At any given age, you're getting better at some things, you're getting worse at some other things, and you're at a plateau at some other things,' said Joshua Hartshorne of MIT's Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and one of the paper's authors.


"Validation Is for Parking Tickets": A Conversation with Lorrie Moore

The New Yorker

Lorrie Moore's first collection of stories, "Self-Help," was published in 1985, when she was twenty-eight and teaching creative writing at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where she would stay for almost thirty years. The collection, a series of stories often told in the second person, used the tropes of self-improvement texts to capture the complicated and sometimes excruciating details of life as a young woman in America, and introduced to readers what Jay McInerney, reviewing the book for the New York Times, called "a distinctive, scalpel-sharp fictional voice that probes . . . the depths of our fears and yearnings." "Self-Help" was followed by three more story collections, "Like Life" (1990), "Birds of America" (1998), and "Bark" (2014); and by three novels, "Anagrams" (1986), "Who Will Run the Frog Hospital?" It was followed by fifteen more, including her devastating, O. Henry Prize-winning portrait of a mother coping with a child's cancer, "People Like That Are the Only People Here," of which Lauren Groff writes, in the introduction to Moore's "Collected Stories," which was published by Everyman, in March, "This is a story written from the deepest part of the soul; it sings with rage and despair, cuts you with its violent maternal love, and wears its wit like the pitch-black bravado of a man facing a firing squad." We carried out this interview by e-mail during the coronavirus lockdown, going back and forth with batches of questions and responses, and responses to the responses, while I was at home in New York and Moore was at home in Nashville, where she has been the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English at Vanderbilt since 2013.