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The Parameterized Complexity of Cascading Portfolio Scheduling

Neural Information Processing Systems

Cascading portfolio scheduling is a static algorithm selection strategy which uses a sample of test instances to compute an optimal ordering (a cascading schedule) of a portfolio of available algorithms. The algorithms are then applied to each future instance according to this cascading schedule, until some algorithm in the schedule succeeds. Cascading algorithm scheduling has proven to be effective in several applications, including QBF solving and the generation of ImageNet classification models. It is known that the computation of an optimal cascading schedule in the offline phase is NP-hard. In this paper we study the parameterized complexity of this problem and establish its fixed-parameter tractability by utilizing structural properties of the success relation between algorithms and test instances.


Boosting Binary Optimization via Binary Classification: A Case Study of Job Shop Scheduling

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Many optimization techniques evaluate solutions consecutively, where the next candidate for evaluation is determined by the results of previous evaluations. For example, these include iterative methods, "black box" optimization algorithms, simulated annealing, evolutionary algorithms and tabu search, to name a few. When solving an optimization problem, these algorithms evaluate a large number of solutions, which raises the following question: Is it possible to learn something about the optimum using these solutions? In this paper, we define this "learning" question in terms of a logistic regression model and explore its predictive accuracy computationally. The proposed model uses a collection of solutions to predict the components of the optimal solutions. To illustrate the utility of such predictions, we embed the logistic regression model into the tabu search algorithm for job shop scheduling problem. The resulting framework is simple to implement, yet provides a significant boost to the performance of the standard tabu search.


Improvements for multi-objective flow shop scheduling by Pareto Iterated Local Search

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The article describes the proposition and application of a local search metaheuristic for multi-objective optimization problems. It is based on two main principles of heuristic search, intensification through variable neighborhoods, and diversification through perturbations and successive iterations in favorable regions of the search space. The concept is successfully tested on permutation flow shop scheduling problems under multiple objectives and compared to other local search approaches. While the obtained results are encouraging in terms of their quality, another positive attribute of the approach is its simplicity as it does require the setting of only very few parameters.


Foundations of the Pareto Iterated Local Search Metaheuristic

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The paper describes the proposition and application of a local search metaheuristic for multi-objective optimization problems. It is based on two main principles of heuristic search, intensification through variable neighborhoods, and diversification through perturbations and successive iterations in favorable regions of the search space. The concept is successfully tested on permutation flow shop scheduling problems under multiple objectives. While the obtained results are encouraging in terms of their quality, another positive attribute of the approach is its' simplicity as it does require the setting of only very few parameters. The implementation of the Pareto Iterated Local Search metaheuristic is based on the MOOPPS computer system of local search heuristics for multi-objective scheduling which has been awarded the European Academic Software Award 2002 in Ronneby, Sweden (http://www.easa-award.net/, http://www.bth.se/llab/easa_2002.nsf)


Optimal Scheduling of Contract Algorithms for Anytime Problem-Solving

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

A contract algorithm is an algorithm which is given, as part of the input, a specified amount of allowable computation time. The algorithm must then complete its execution within the allotted time. An interruptible algorithm, in contrast, can be interrupted at an arbitrary point in time, at which point it must report its currently best solution. It is known that contract algorithms can simulate interruptible algorithms using iterative deepening techniques. This simulation is done at a penalty in the performance of the solution, as measured by the so-called acceleration ratio.