FRACTALS are key to the many images in Rorschach inkblots

Daily Mail - Science & tech

From bats to jack-o-lanterns, Rorschach's inkblots brought out a vast array of image associations during their use, with up to 300 different images recorded for each of the 10 blots. A new study found that fractal characteristics at the edges of the blots may give rise to their differing interpretations, as they are fooling the visual system. Rorschach's inkblots are shown in the images on the top, while the bottom images reveal the blots with their fractal patterns removed The inkblot tests for psychological assessment were introduced by Hermann Rorschach, a Swiss Freudian psychiatrist. Rorschach published 10 blot patterns in 1921, with five done in black and white and five in colour. The psychiatrist poured different amounts and kinds of ink onto the cards and folded and pressed them to create symmetrical patterns.


The Real Secret of Youth Is Complexity - Issue 68: Context

Nautilus

Saint Thomas Aquinas preached that simplicity brings one closer to God. Isaac Newton believed it leads to truth. The process of simplification, we're told, can illuminate beauty, strip away needless clutter and stress, and help us focus on what really matters. It can also be a sign of aging. Youthful health and vigor depend, in many ways, on complexity.


The Real Secret of Youth Is Complexity - Issue 36: Aging

Nautilus

Saint Thomas Aquinas preached that simplicity brings one closer to God. Isaac Newton believed it leads to truth. The process of simplification, we're told, can illuminate beauty, strip away needless clutter and stress, and help us focus on what really matters. It can also be a sign of aging. Youthful health and vigor depend, in many ways, on complexity.


SHADING INTO TEXTURE

AAAI Conferences

Alex P. Pentland Artificial Intelligence Center, SRI International 333 Ravenswood Ave., Menlo Park, California 94025 ABSTRACT Shape-from-shading and shape-from-texture methods have the To accomplish this, we must have rccour8e to a 3-D model competent to describe both crumpled surface8 and smooth ones. The fractal model of surface shape [6,7] appears to possess the required properties. Evidence for this comes from recently conducted surveys of natural imagery [6,8]. These survey found that the fractal model of imaged 3-D surfaces furnishes an accurate description of most textured and shaded image regions. Perhaps even more convincing, however, is the fact that fractals look like natural surfaces [9,10,11].


Nature, the IT Wizard - Issue 48: Chaos

Nautilus

As space exploration geared up in the 1960s, scientists were faced with a new dilemma. How could they recognize life on other planets, where it may have evolved very differently--and therefore have a different chemical signature--than it has on Earth? James Lovelock, father of the Gaia theory, gave this advice: Look for order. Every organism is a brief upwelling of structure from chaos, a self-assembled wonder that must jealously defend its order until the day it dies. Sophisticated information processing is necessary to preserve and pass down the rules for maintaining this order, yet life is built out of the messiest materials: tumbling chemicals, soft cells, and tangled polymers.