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Towards Semantic Literature Based Discovery

AAAI Conferences

Previous systems for literature based discovery, an automatic method of identifying hidden knowledge, have largely been based on bag of words approaches which perform only limited semantic analysis and interpretation. We describe the shortcomings of these approaches and suggest possible solutions that make use of techniques from Natural Language Processing.


Research in Progress

AI Magazine

Stanford Unzversity Stanford, CA 94805 F'OUNDED EARLY IN 1983, the Center for the Study of Language and Information [CSLI] at Stanford University grew out of a longstanding collaboration between scientists at research laboratories in the Palo Alto area and the facult,y and students of several Stanford University departments and out of a need for an institutional focus for this work on natural and computer languages. At present, CSLI has 17 senior members and about as many associate members, from SRI International, Xerox PARC, Fairchild, and the Departments of Computer Science, Linguistics, and Philosophy at Stanford. Since the Center's research will overlap with the work of other researchers around the world, an important goal of CSLI is to initiate a major outreach, whereby members of CSLI both inform themselves of work done elsewhere and share their own results with others. Questions about CSLI or Program SL should be addressed to Elizabeth Macken, Assistant Director, CSLI, Ven-tura Hall, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. This collection of projects aims at developing scientific theories of natural-language use consonant with our basic perspective on language users as finite information processors.


AIs that read sentences can also spot virus mutations

MIT Technology Review

In a study published in Science today, Berger and her colleagues pull several of these strands together and use NLP to predict mutations that allow viruses to avoid being detected by antibodies in the human immune system, a process known as viral immune escape. The basic idea is that the interpretation of a virus by an immune system is analogous to the interpretation of a sentence by a human. "It's a neat paper, building off the momentum of previous work," says Ali Madani, a scientist at Salesforce, who is using NLP to predict protein sequences. Berger's team uses two different linguistic concepts: grammar and semantics (or meaning). The genetic or evolutionary fitness of a virus--characteristics such as how good it is at infecting a host--can be interpreted in terms of grammatical correctness.


Center for the Study of Language and Information Research Program on Situated Language

AI Magazine

Founded early in 1983, the center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI) at Stanford University grew out of a long-standing collaboration between scientists at research laboratories in the Palo Alto area and the faculty and students of several Stanford University departments and out of a need for an institutional focus for this work on natural and computer languages. At present, CSLI has 17 senior members and about as many associate members, from SRI International, Xerox PARC, Fairchild, and the Department of Computer Science, Linguistics, and Philosophy at Stanford. Since the Center's research will overlap with the work of other researchers around the world, an important goal of CSLI is to initiate a major outreach, whereby members of CSLI both inform themselves of work done elsewhere and share their own results with others.


How Zika attacks the brain: Virus causes the stem cells to SELF-DESTRUCT – and the findings could pave the way for a treatment

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers may have reached a breakthrough in understanding how the Zika virus causes babies to be born with birth defects and developmental problems. A study found that the virus activates a branch of the immune system which disrupts the activity of genes needed for brain development, resulting in microcephaly. The new findings show that the immune response to the virus – which causes stem cells in the brain to die – could potentially be dialled down in order to reduce the effects of the virus and reduce associated birth defects. Evidence of a link between the virus and smaller head size emerged during the initial outbreak of Zika in South and Central America last year. Increased incidence of microcephaly in babies born from infected mothers was reported in Brazil and other Latin American countries, and health officials in the US have since confirmed the link.