Goto

Collaborating Authors

583

AI Magazine

An informal workshop on concurrent logic programming, metaprogramming, and open systems was held at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) on 8-9 September 1987 with support from the American Association for Artificial Intelligence. The 50 workshop participants came from the Japanese Fifth Generation Project (ICOT), the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, Imperial College in London, the Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU), Cal Tech, Science University of Tokyo, Melbourne University, Calgary University, University of Wisconsin, Case Western Reserve, University of Oregon, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Quintus, Symbolics, IBM, and Xerox PARC. No proceedings were generated; instead, participants distributed copies of drafts, slides, and recent papers. A shared vision emerged from the morning session with concurrent logic programming fulfilling the same role that C and Assembler do now. Languages such as Flat Concurrent Prolog and Guarded Horn Clauses are seen as general-purpose, parallel machine languages and interface languages between hardware and software and not, as a newcomer to this field might expect, as high-level, AI, problemsolving languages.


Concurrent Logic Programming, Metaprogramming, and Open Systems

AI Magazine

An informal workshop on concurrent logic programming, metaprogramming, and open systems was held at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) on 8-9 September 1987 with support from the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. The 50 workshop participants came from the Japanese Fifth Generation Project (ICOT), the Weizmann Institute of Sci-ence in Israel, Imperial College in London, the Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Stanford University, the Mas-sachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), Cal Tech, Science University of Tokyo, Melbourne University, Calgary University, University of Wisconsin, Case Western Reserve, University of Oregon, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Quintus, Symbolics, IBM, and Xerox PARC. No proceedings were generated; instead, participants distributed copies of drafts, slides, and recent papers.


Natural Language Understanding and Logic Programming

AI Magazine

About 70 participants from 10 countries attended the various talks and discussions in a particularly friendly and cooperative atmosphere. This workshop was sponsored by Simon Fraser University, the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, and the French Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique. The final proceedings will be published in April 1988 by North Holland. Before briefly introducing the main trends of the workshop, let me precisely define what is meant by natural language understanding and logic programming. In light of some of the talks and discussions, it turns out that this title applies to works where logic programming (in particular, Prolog, although there are a number of other logic-programming languages) is viewed as a convenient implementation framework and a clear (and sometimes simple) formal framework for describing linguistic phenomena.


Natural Language Understanding and Logic Programming

AI Magazine

Johnson-Laird In a field choked with seemingly impenetrable jargon, Quick and thorough. Philip Johnson-Laird has done the impossible: written a By mixing forward and backward chaining, goal search book about how the mind works that requires no advance time can be shortenedramatically And, using GURU's knowledge of artificial intelligence, neurophysiology, or multiple rule firing capabilityou can refire rules psychology, providing the single best introduction to cognitive as values change GURU also comes equipped with science available. "Philip Johnson-Laird has that rare gift of being a cognitive seamlessly integrated 4th generation decision support scientist of the first order, yet he addresses himself to capabilitiesuch as data base, spreadsheet, and the deep classical issues in psychology, in the philosophy report generator


Logic Programming as a Service

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

New generations of distributed systems are opening novel perspectives for logic programming (LP): on the one hand, service-oriented architectures represent nowadays the standard approach for distributed systems engineering; on the other hand, pervasive systems mandate for situated intelligence. In this paper we introduce the notion of Logic Programming as a Service (LPaaS) as a means to address the needs of pervasive intelligent systems through logic engines exploited as a distributed service. First we define the abstract architectural model by re-interpreting classical LP notions in the new context; then we elaborate on the nature of LP interpreted as a service by describing the basic LPaaS interface. Finally, we show how LPaaS works in practice by discussing its implementation in terms of distributed tuProlog engines, accounting for basic issues such as interoperability and configurability.