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Purdue student who was charged in the murder of his roommate plans to use insanity defense

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. A Purdue University student charged with murder in the stabbing death of his dormitory roommate has filed notice in court that he plans to use an insanity defense. In a motion electronically filed Friday, Ji Min Sha's attorney, Kyle Cray, requested the court to appoint "two or three competent and disinterested psychiatrists, psychologists or physicians who have expertise in determining competency to examine the Defendant and report to this Court on his competence to stand trial." The motion also sought to schedule a competency hearing for Sha, the Journal and Courier reported.


Air Force boosts funding for technology using artificial intelligence for 3D manufacturing

#artificialintelligence

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - 3D manufacturing technology from a Purdue University-affiliated company may soon play an even bigger part in helping the Department of Defense manage its digital assets to protect the United States. Imaginestics LLC, a software company headquartered in the Purdue Research Park of West Lafayette, has received a $1.5 million SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) Phase II grant through the U.S. Air Force. The award comes after the company was hired in 2017 to create a new system for the Air Force to better manage additive manufacturing (AM). "Imaginestics' mission is to build artificial intelligence-powered solutions for managing digital assets, which aligns perfectly with the needs of the Air Force," said Jamie Tan, CEO and co-founder of Imaginestics. Jason Mann, additive manufacturing technical lead for the 76th CMXG Reverse Engineering and Critical Tooling (REACT) lab at Tinker Air Force Base, said, "Imaginestics is building an Additive Manufacturing Advisory System (AMAS) that will provide the Air Force with a method of effectively storing, manipulating and presenting AM data in a form useful to AM engineers. It will provide provenance for AM parts, the ability to see trends in AM equipment performance, and manage the workflow for AM and reverse engineering tasks. Hosting the software on the AWS GovCloud will allow other depots to utilize the software to share AM data between all organizations involved in AM, while also supporting downstream processes that go with AM to minimize depot maintenance cost."


Air Force boosts funding for digital technology using artificial intelligence for 3D manufacturing

#artificialintelligence

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – 3D manufacturing technology from a Purdue University-affiliated company may soon play an even bigger part in helping the Department of Defense manage its digital assets to protect the United States. Imaginestics LLC, a software company headquartered in the Purdue Research Park of West Lafayette, has received a $1.5 million SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) Phase II grant through the U.S. Air Force. The award comes after the company was hired in 2017 to create a new system for the Air Force to better manage additive manufacturing (AM). "Imaginestics' mission is to build artificial intelligence-powered solutions for managing digital assets, which aligns perfectly with the needs of the Air Force," said Jamie Tan, CEO and co-founder of Imaginestics. Jason Mann, additive manufacturing technical lead for the 76th CMXG Reverse Engineering and Critical Tooling (REACT) lab at Tinker Air Force Base, said, "Imaginestics is building an Additive Manufacturing Advisory System (AMAS) that will provide the Air Force with a method of effectively storing, manipulating and presenting AM data in a form useful to AM engineers. It will provide provenance for AM parts, the ability to see trends in AM equipment performance, and manage the workflow for AM and reverse engineering tasks. Hosting the software on the AWS GovCloud will allow other depots to utilize the software to share AM data between all organizations involved in AM, while also supporting downstream processes that go with AM to minimize depot maintenance cost."


Best online colleges in Indiana 2022

ZDNet

You can enjoy flexible course delivery, career-focused degrees, and traditional academic fields of study. Distance education can prepare learners to find employment or advance their careers in Indiana's top industries, including advanced manufacturing, aerospace and aviation, agriculture bioscience, life sciences, logistics and transportation, and technology. Whether you're looking for bachelor's or master's degrees, our school rankings can launch your search for the right program. You can trust ZDNet's ranking methodology to provide objective, accurate, and up-to-date information. We do our own research, apply rigorous editing and fact-checking, and evaluate metrics including academic quality, affordability, and number of available online bachelor's and master's degree programs.


The brain's secret to life-long learning can now come as hardware for artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

As companies use more and more data to improve how AI recognizes images, learns languages and carries out other complex tasks, a paper publishing in Science this week shows a way that computer chips could dynamically rewire themselves to take in new data like the brain does, helping AI to keep learning over time. "The brains of living beings can continuously learn throughout their lifespan. We have now created an artificial platform for machines to learn throughout their lifespan," said Shriram Ramanathan, a professor in Purdue University's School of Materials Engineering who specializes in discovering how materials could mimic the brain to improve computing. Unlike the brain, which constantly forms new connections between neurons to enable learning, the circuits on a computer chip don't change. A circuit that a machine has been using for years isn't any different than the circuit that was originally built for the machine in a factory.