CES 2018: Intel's 49-Qubit Chip Shoots for Quantum Supremacy

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Intel has passed a key milestone while running alongside Google and IBM in the marathon to build quantum computing systems. The tech giant has unveiled a superconducting quantum test chip with 49 qubits: enough qubits to possibly enable quantum computing that begins to exceed the practical limits of modern classical computers.


7 Core Qubit Technologies for Quantum Computing - Amit Ray

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Here we discussed the advantages and limitations of seven key qubit technologies for designing efficient quantum computing systems. The seven qubit types are: Superconducting qubits, Quantum dots qubits, Trapped Ion Qubits, Photonic qubits, Defect-based qubits, Topological Qubits, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) . They are the seven pathways for designing effective quantum computing systems. Each one of them have their own limitations and advantages. We have also discussed the hierarchies of qubit types.


Physicists record "lifetime" of graphene qubits

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Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have recorded, for the first time, the "temporal coherence" of a graphene qubit -- meaning how long it can maintain a special state that allows it to represent two logical states simultaneously. The demonstration, which used a new kind of graphene-based qubit, represents a critical step forward for practical quantum computing, the researchers say. Superconducting quantum bits (simply, qubits) are artificial atoms that use various methods to produce bits of quantum information, the fundamental component of quantum computers. Similar to traditional binary circuits in computers, qubits can maintain one of two states corresponding to the classic binary bits, a 0 or 1. But these qubits can also be a superposition of both states simultaneously, which could allow quantum computers to solve complex problems that are practically impossible for traditional computers.


Quantum Computing Update: 53-Qubit Simulator, Superconducting Interconnects Bring Future Computers Closer

International Business Times

They are billed as machines that will change the future, but quantum computers themselves are still in the future. All the same, scientists have been working on developing a working quantum computer for years now, and the frenzied competition to be the first has yielded a new record -- a 53-qubit quantum simulator.


Google's quantum computer inches nearer after landmark performance breakthrough

ZDNet

In this superconducting quantum chip, each of the nine cross-shaped qubits is connected to its neighbors and individually controlled. Google engineers have found a way to make the company's D-Wave quantum computer more scalable and capable of solving problems in multiple fields. According to Nature, Google has created a device that blends analog and digital approaches to deliver enough quantum bits, or qubits, to create a scalable, multi-purpose quantum computer, capable of solving chemistry and physics problems by, for example, simulating molecules at the quantum level. The analog approach, or adiabatic quantum computing (AQC), underpins the D-Wave quantum computer Google bought a few years ago. But, as Nature notes, errors can't be corrected as systematically as they can on digital circuits.