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Sentiment Analysis of Short Informal Texts

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

We describe a state-of-the-art sentiment analysis system that detects (a) the sentiment of short informal textual messages such as tweets and SMS (message-level task) and (b) the sentiment of a word or a phrase within a message (term-level task). The system is based on a supervised statistical text classification approach leveraging a variety of surface-form, semantic, and sentiment features. The sentiment features are primarily derived from novel high-coverage tweet-specific sentiment lexicons. These lexicons are automatically generated from tweets with sentiment-word hashtags and from tweets with emoticons. To adequately capture the sentiment of words in negated contexts, a separate sentiment lexicon is generated for negated words. The system ranked first in the SemEval-2013 shared task `Sentiment Analysis in Twitter' (Task 2), obtaining an F-score of 69.02 in the message-level task and 88.93 in the term-level task. Post-competition improvements boost the performance to an F-score of 70.45 (message-level task) and 89.50 (term-level task). The system also obtains state-of-the-art performance on two additional datasets: the SemEval-2013 SMS test set and a corpus of movie review excerpts. The ablation experiments demonstrate that the use of the automatically generated lexicons results in performance gains of up to 6.5 absolute percentage points.


Co-Training Based Bilingual Sentiment Lexicon Learning

AAAI Conferences

In this paper, we address the issue of bilingual sentiment lexicon learning(BSLL) which aims to automatically and simultaneously generate sentiment words for two languages. The underlying motivation is that sentiment information from two languages can perform iterative mutual-teaching in the learning procedure. We propose to develop two classifiers to determine the sentiment polarities of words under a co-training framework, which makes full use of the two-view sentiment information from the two languages. The word alignment derived from the parallel corpus is leveraged to design effective features and to bridge the learning of the two classifiers. The experimental results on English and Chinese languages show the effectiveness of our approach in BSLL.


Sentiment Analysis with Global Topics and Local Dependency

AAAI Conferences

With the development of Web 2.0, sentiment analysis has now become a popular research problem to tackle. Recently, topic models have been introduced for the simultaneous analysis for topics and the sentiment in a document. These studies, which jointly model topic and sentiment, take the advantage of the relationship between topics and sentiment, and are shown to be superior to traditional sentiment analysis tools. However, most of them make the assumption that, given the parameters, the sentiments of the words in the document are all independent. In our observation, in contrast, sentiments are expressed in a coherent way. The local conjunctive words, such as “and” or “but”, are often indicative of sentiment transitions. In this paper, we propose a major departure from the previous approaches by making two linked contributions. First, we assume that the sentiments are related to the topic in the document, and put forward a joint sentiment and topic model, i.e. Sentiment-LDA. Second, we observe that sentiments are dependent on local context. Thus, we further extend the Sentiment-LDA model to Dependency-Sentiment-LDA model by relaxing the sentiment independent assumption in Sentiment-LDA. The sentiments of words are viewed as a Markov chain in Dependency-Sentiment-LDA. Through experiments, we show that exploiting the sentiment dependency is clearly advantageous, and that the Dependency-Sentiment-LDA is an effective approach for sentiment analysis.


NaijaSenti: A Nigerian Twitter Sentiment Corpus for Multilingual Sentiment Analysis

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Sentiment analysis is one of the most widely studied applications in NLP, but most work focuses on languages with large amounts of data. We introduce the first large-scale human-annotated Twitter sentiment dataset for the four most widely spoken languages in Nigeria (Hausa, Igbo, Nigerian-Pidgin, and Yor\`ub\'a ) consisting of around 30,000 annotated tweets per language (and 14,000 for Nigerian-Pidgin), including a significant fraction of code-mixed tweets. We propose text collection, filtering, processing and labeling methods that enable us to create datasets for these low-resource languages. We evaluate a rangeof pre-trained models and transfer strategies on the dataset. We find that language-specific models and language-adaptivefine-tuning generally perform best. We release the datasets, trained models, sentiment lexicons, and code to incentivizeresearch on sentiment analysis in under-represented languages.


Sentiment Analysis with AFINN Lexicon – Himanshu Lohiya – Medium

#artificialintelligence

The AFINN lexicon is perhaps one of the simplest and most popular lexicons that can be used extensively for sentiment analysis. The current version of the lexicon is AFINN-en-165. You can find this lexicon at the author's official GitHub repository. The author has also created a nice wrapper library on top of this in Python called afinn, which we will be using for our analysis. Let's look at some visualisations now.