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The Future of AI -- A Manifesto

AI Magazine

The long-term goal of AI is human-level AI. This is still not directly definable, although we still know of human abilities that even the the best present programs on the fastest computers have not been able to emulate, such as playing master-level go and learning science from the Internet. Basic researchers in AI should measure their work as to the extent to which it advances this goal.


On John McCarthy's 80th Birthday, in Honor of His Contributions

AI Magazine

John McCarthy's contributions to computer science and artificial intelligence are legendary. He invented Lisp, made substantial contributions to early work in timesharing and the theory of computation, and was one of the founders of artificial intelligence and knowledge representation. This article, written in honor of McCarthy's 80th birthday, presents a brief biography, an overview of the major themes of his research, and a discussion of several of his major papers. It was not his dream of an intelligent computer that was unique, or even first: Alan Turing (Turing 1950) had envisioned a computer that could converse intelligently with humans back in 1950; by the mid 1950s, there were several researchers (including Herbert Simon, Allen Newell, Oliver Selfridge, and Marvin Minsky) working in what would be called artificial intelligence. What distinguished McCarthy's plan was his emphasis on using mathematical logic both as a language for representing the knowledge that an intelligent machine should have and as a means for reasoning with that knowledge.


On John McCarthy's 80th Birthday, in Honor of His Contributions

AI Magazine

John McCarthy's contributions to computer science and artificial intelligence are legendary. He invented Lisp, made substantial contributions to early work in timesharing and the theory of computation, and was one of the founders of artificial intelligence and knowledge representation. This article, written in honor of McCarthy's 80th birthday, presents a brief biography, an overview of the major themes of his research, and a discussion of several of his major papers.


Who is the Father Of Artificial Intelligence?

#artificialintelligence

Every feature of intelligence or learning aspects in principle can be so precisely described that a machine can seamlessly simulate it. John McCarthy, who is the Father of Artificial Intelligence, was a pioneer in the fields of AI. He not only is credited to be the founder of AI, but also one who coined the term Artificial Intelligence. In 1955, John McCarthy coined the term Artificial Intelligence, which he proposed in the famous Dartmouth conference in 1956. This conference attended by 10-computer scientists, saw McCarthy explore ways in which machines can learn and reason like humans.


McCarthy as Scientist and Engineer, with Personal Recollections

AI Magazine

At one of those conferences, I met John. Stanford moved toward a computer science department under the leadership of George Forsythe, John suggested to George, and then supported, the idea of hiring me into the founding faculty of the department. Since we were both Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) contract awardees, we quickly formed a close bond concerning ARPA-sponsored AI research and graduate student teaching. And the joint intelligence of both of us was quickly deployed in a very rapid and, in retrospect, brilliant decision to hire Les Earnest to be the executive officer of the new Stanford AI Lab that ARPA supported. John McCarthy's first breakthrough paper was his 1958 Teddington Symposium paper on programs with commonsense reasoning abilities.