The Future of AI -- A Manifesto

AI Magazine

The long-term goal of AI is human-level AI. This is still not directly definable, although we still know of human abilities that even the the best present programs on the fastest computers have not been able to emulate, such as playing master-level go and learning science from the Internet. Basic researchers in AI should measure their work as to the extent to which it advances this goal.


On John McCarthy's 80th Birthday, in Honor of His Contributions

AI Magazine

John McCarthy's contributions to computer science and artificial intelligence are legendary. He invented Lisp, made substantial contributions to early work in timesharing and the theory of computation, and was one of the founders of artificial intelligence and knowledge representation. This article, written in honor of McCarthy's 80th birthday, presents a brief biography, an overview of the major themes of his research, and a discussion of several of his major papers. It was not his dream of an intelligent computer that was unique, or even first: Alan Turing (Turing 1950) had envisioned a computer that could converse intelligently with humans back in 1950; by the mid 1950s, there were several researchers (including Herbert Simon, Allen Newell, Oliver Selfridge, and Marvin Minsky) working in what would be called artificial intelligence. What distinguished McCarthy's plan was his emphasis on using mathematical logic both as a language for representing the knowledge that an intelligent machine should have and as a means for reasoning with that knowledge.


On John McCarthy's 80th Birthday, in Honor of His Contributions

AI Magazine

John McCarthy's contributions to computer science and artificial intelligence are legendary. He invented Lisp, made substantial contributions to early work in timesharing and the theory of computation, and was one of the founders of artificial intelligence and knowledge representation. This article, written in honor of McCarthy's 80th birthday, presents a brief biography, an overview of the major themes of his research, and a discussion of several of his major papers.


Historical Remarks on Nonmonotonic Reasoning, Especially Circumscription

AAAI Conferences

Humans have always done nonmonotonic reasoning, but rigorous monotonic reasoning in reaching given conclusions has been deservedly more respected and admired. Euclid contains the first extended monotonically reasoned text available to a large public. I suspect that even Euclid did nonmonotonic reasoning in arguing for the postulates. It is unfortunate that the rigorous monotonic reasoning of Euclid has been deemphasized in education, because Euclid generates in people who are not mathematically minded a respect for rigor. Conclusions derived by monotonic logical reasoning from precisely stated premises have always been the ideal.