In Memoriam: Arthur Samuel: Pioneer in Machine Learning

AI Magazine

Arthur Samuel (1901-1990) was a pioneer of artificial intelligence research. From 1949 through the late 1960s, he did the best work in making computers learn from their expe-rience. His vehicle for this work was the game of checkers.


Articles

AI Magazine

Samuel's successes included a victory by his program over a master-level player. In fact, the opponent was not a master, and Samuel himself had no illusions about his program's strength. This single event, a milestone in AI, was magnified out of proportion by the media and helped to create the impression that checkers was a solved game. Nevertheless, his work stands as a major achievement in machine learning and AI. Since 1950, the checkers world has been dominated by Tinsley.


Man Versus Machine for the World Checkers Championship

AI Magazine

In August 1992, the world checkers champion, Marion Tinsley, defended his title against the computer program CHINOOK. Because of its success in human tournaments, CHINOOK had earned the right to play for the world championship. Tinsley won the best-of-40-game match with a score of 4 wins, 2 losses, and 33 draws. This event was the first time in history that a program played for a human world championship and might be a prelude to what is to come in chess. This article tells the story of the first Man versus Machine World Championship match.


Machine Learning Quick Start โ€“ Don't Fear the Machines - Data Tech Blog

#artificialintelligence

Not long ago, Hadoop's technology was supposed to solve all the world's complex data problems. "From the time it went open source in 2007, Hadoop and its related technologies have been profound drivers of the growth of data science." While Hadoop continues to solve some thorny data problems, pundits are now asking "Is Hadoop dead?" It's a sad state of affairs when most organizations have yet to fully understand and take advantage of Hadoop but it is already seen as obsolete โ€“ things are moving awfully fast! In my eighteen years as a data professional, I've experienced many data transformations and technological advances.


A Gamut of Games

AI Magazine

In 1950, Claude Shannon published his seminal work on how to program a computer to play chess. Since then, developing game-playing programs that can compete with (and even exceed) the abilities of the human world champions has been a long-sought-after goal of the AI research community. In Shannon's time, it would have seemed unlikely that only a scant 50 years would be needed to develop programs that play world-class backgammon, checkers, chess, Othello, and Scrabble. These remarkable achievements are the result of a better understanding of the problems being solved, major algorithmic insights, and tremendous advances in hardware technology. Computer games research is one of the important success stories of AI.