Creative Adversarial Networks: GANs that make art

#artificialintelligence

Generative Adversarial Networks use a pair of machine-learning models to create things that seem very realistic: one of the models, the "generator," uses its training data to make new things; and the other, the "discerner," checks the generator's output to see if it conforms to the model. Rutgers comp sci prof Ahmed Elgammal runs an Art and AI Lab where they use "Creative Adversarial Networks" to produce new artworks: CANs use a "discerner" that seeks out "novelty," not fidelity to the statistical predictions of the model. The underlying theory is that art evolves "through small alterations to a known style that produce a new one," which, as Ian Bogost (previously) points out, is "a convenient take, given that any machine-learning technique has to base its work on a specific training set." Elgammal recent exhibited a show called Faceless Portraits Transcending Time at Chelsea's HG Contemporary gallery; and his choice of portraiture as a means of showcasing the capabilities of CANs has proven to be controversial: as art historian John Sharp says, "You can't really pick a form of painting that's more charged with cultural meaning than portraiture." Portraits use extensive, coded symbology to say something about their subjects, and CANs do not, by themselves, understand or correctly use these symbols in the works they create.


Princess Eugenie's Marrying A Tequila Ambassador; Couple Survives Long Distance Relationship

International Business Times

Princess Eugenie's future husband is a tequila ambassador. After Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's royal wedding, his cousin, Princess Eugenie, is walking down the aisle next. According to Express, Sarah Ferguson and Prince Andrew's youngest daughter is marrying a wine merchant. Princess Eugenie's fiancé, Jack Brooksbank, is the son of George Brooksbank, a chartered accountant and company director. Brooksbank started his career as a waiter at Chelsea's Admiral Codrington pub before he joined the Markham Inn.


How online art galleries are serving up talent -- and sales -- without the 'tude

Los Angeles Times

You know that awful feeling of walking into a snooty art gallery and the staff vaguely lifts up their heads and gives you the once-over? "We're the opposite of that," said Rebecca Wilson, chief curator for SaatchiArt.com. What Wilson is describing speaks to the engine behind the online market for original art, which saw global sales rise 15% in 2016 to $3.75 billion -- because when you're browsing online art galleries, no one cares how big your entourage is. Thoughtfully curated, original art and limited- or open-edition prints showcased in online galleries such as SaatchiArt, Tappan, UGallery and Pure Photo are successfully bridging a gap between emerging artists and aspiring collectors by creating access to talent while sidestepping high-end, bricks-and-mortar galleries. "I think our customer is someone who wasn't going to physical galleries," said Alex Farkas, gallery director for UGallery.com,


Tate Britain project uses AI to pair contemporary photos with paintings

#artificialintelligence

Seated against a deep red backdrop, gazing intently at hand-held mirrors, two eunuchs in sparkling saris inspect their appearance before Raksha Bandhan celebrations in the red light district of Mumbai. The photograph from the Reuters news agency is an arresting contemporary scene, but a new Tate Britain project is aiming to inspire deeper reflections with images from its own collection of paintings. Launching on Friday, Recognition is the winner of 2016's IK Prize – an annual award, this year supported by Microsoft, for a project that embraces digital technology to explore and showcase Tate's collection of British art. This year, the challenge was to do it with artificial intelligence. The team behind the winning project, from Italy-based communication research centre, Fabrica, say their inspiration came from an intriguing conundrum: how can you apply rational thinking to a subject like art? Recognition matches stunning photographs from the 24/7 news cycle with centuries-old artworks, and presents them online.


Tate Britain project uses AI to pair contemporary photos with paintings

#artificialintelligence

Seated against a deep red backdrop, gazing intently at hand-held mirrors, two eunuchs in sparkling saris inspect their appearance before Raksha Bandhan celebrations in the red light district of Mumbai. The photograph from the Reuters news agency is an arresting contemporary scene, but a new Tate Britain project is aiming to inspire deeper reflections with images from its own collection of paintings. Launching on Friday, Recognition is the winner of 2016's IK prize – an annual award, this year supported by Microsoft, for a project that embraces digital technology to explore and showcase Tate's collection of British art. This year, the challenge was to do it with artificial intelligence. The team behind the winning project, from the Italy-based communication research centre Fabrica, say their inspiration came from an intriguing conundrum: how can you apply rational thinking to a subject like art? Recognition matches stunning photographs from the 24/7 news cycle with centuries-old artworks, and presents them online.