Automated Deduction in Nonstandard Logics

AI Magazine

The American Association for Artificial Intelligence held its 1993 Fall Symposium Series on October 22-24 in Raleigh, North Carolina. This article contains summaries of the five symposia that were conducted: Automated Deduction in Nonstandard Logics; Games: Planning and Learning; Human-Computer Collaboration: Reconciling Theory, Synthesizing Practice; Instantiating Intelligent Agents; and Machine Learning and Computer Vision: What, Why, and How? This article contains summaries of the five symposia that were conducted: Automated Deduction in Nonstandard Logics; Games: Planning and Learning; Human-Computer Collaboration: Reconciling Theory, Synthesizing Practice; Instantiating Intelligent Agents; and Machine Learning and Computer Vision: What, Why, and How? Over the past decade, a wide variety of methods have been developed for automating deduction, with an even wider variety of nonstandard logics. The goals of the Automated Deduction in Nonstandard Logics Symposium were to bring together researchers working in this area with the aim of promoting comparisons of the various deduction methods that have been proposed, foster discussion of the different problems involved in automating the various logics, and obtain reports on the use of theorem provers for nonstandard logics in AI systems.


Modal and Temporal Logics-Based Planning for Open Networked Multimedia Systems

AI Magazine

The titles of the five symposia were Modal and Temporal Logics-Based Planning for Open Networked Multimedia Systems Narrative Intelligence Psychological Models of Communication in Collaborative Systems Question-Answering Systems Using Layout for the Generation, Understanding, or Retrieval of Documents This article concludes with a previously unpublished report on the 1998 AAAI Fall Symposium on AI and Link Analysis. This symposium provided a forum for researchers involved in using formal methods and in design of networked multimedia systems and adaptivereactive systems to identify common ground, relevant experiences, applications, open problems, and possible future developments. To support intelligent and interactive multimedia applications, there's a need to tailor systems to possess and use knowledge about the application domain, user-requirement tasks, the context of interaction, communication, and performance parameters. Temporal and modal logics have been used to reason about time, action, and adaptive change and to program and verify networked systems. The 1999 American Association for Artificial Intelligence Fall Symposium Series was held Friday through Sunday, 5-7 November 1999, at the Sea Crest Oceanfront Resort and Conference Center.


Reports on the AAAI Fall Symposia (November 1999 and November 1998)

AI Magazine

The 1999 Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Fall Symposium Series was held Friday through Sunday, 5-7 November 1999, at the Sea Crest Oceanfront Resort and Conference Center. The titles of the five symposia were (1) Modal and Temporal Logics-Based Planning for Open Networked Multimedia Systems; (2) Narrative Intelligence; (3) Psychological Models of Communication in Collaborative Systems; (4) Question-Answering Systems; and (5) Using Layout for the Generation, Understanding, or Retrieval of Documents.


Control of the Physical World by Intelligent Agents: Putting the Pieces Together

AI Magazine

This article contains summaries of the five symposia that were conducted: (1) Control of the Physical World by Intelligent Agents, (2) Improving Instruction of Introductory AI, (3) Knowledge Representation for Natural Language Processing in Implemented Systems, (4) Planning and Learning: On to Real Applications, and (5) Relevance. Proceedings of most of the symposia are available as technical reports from AAAI. Control of the physical world, whether by mobile robots or by chemical process controllers, involves many disciplines, including conventional process control, neural networks, fuzzy logic, decision theory, planning, and vision. This workshop brought together researchers from these and other fields with the aim of enumerating the methods available; making a stab at generating a framework for putting them together; and addressing questions such as, How can control help AI? and How can AI help control? A recurring theme was the benefits--or lack thereof--of hierarchical systems: A majority of the attendees supported the position that hierarchy was necessary: Low-level subsystems process sensory input and execute control strategies, and higher-level systems select control strategies appropriate for the task at hand, especially by planning and, perhaps, developing and using maps of the environment.


1994 Fall Symposium Series Reports

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1994 Fall Symposium Series on November 4-6 at the Monteleone Hotel in New Orleans, Louisiana. This article contains summaries of the five symposia that were conducted: (1) Control of the Physical World by Intelligent Agents, (2) Improving Instruction of Introductory AI, (3) Knowledge Representation for Natural Language Processing in Implemented Systems, (4) Planning and Learning: On to Real Applications, and (5) Relevance.