1505

AI Magazine

The RoboCup Rescue Physical Agent League Competition was held in the summer of 2001 in conjunction with the AAAI Mobile Robot Competition Urban Search and Rescue event, eerily preceding the September 11 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster. Four teams responded to the WTC disaster through the auspices of the Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue (CRASAR), directed by John Blitch. The four teams were Foster-Miller and iRobot (both robot manufacturers from the Boston area), the United States Navy's Space Warfare Center (SPAWAR) group from San Diego, and the University of South Florida (USF). Blitch, through his position as program manager for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Tactical Mobile Robots Program, was a supporter of the competition; he also served as a member of the rules committee and a judge. USF participated by chairing the rules committee, judging, assisting with the logistics, providing commentary, and demonstrating tethered and wireless robots whenever entrants had to skip around during the competition.


National Science Foundation Summer Field Institute for Rescue Robots for Research and Response (R4)

AI Magazine

Fifteen scientists from six universities and five companies were embedded with a team of search and rescue professionals from the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Indiana Task Force 1 in August 2003 at a demolished building in Lebanon, Indiana. The highly realistic 27-hour exercise enabled participants to identify the prevailing issues in rescue robotics. Perception and situation awareness were deemed the most pressing problems, with a recommendation to focus on human-computer cooperative algorithms because recognition in dense rubble appears far beyond the capabilities of computer vision for the near term. Human-robot interaction was cited as another critical area as well as the general problem of how the robot can maintain communications with the rescuers. The field exercise was part of an ongoing grant from the National Science Foundation to the Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue CRASAR), and CRASAR is sponsoring similar activities in summer 2004.


AAAI/RoboCup-2001 Urban Search and Rescue Events

AI Magazine

The RoboCup Rescue Physical Agent League Competition was held in the summer of 2001 in conjunction with the AAAI Mobile Robot Competition Urban Search and Rescue event, eerily preceding the September 11 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster. Four teams responded to the WTC disaster through the auspices of the Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue (CRASAR), directed by John Blitch. Blitch, through his position as program manager for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Tactical Mobile Robots Program, was a supporter of the competition; he also served as a member of the rules committee and a judge. USF participated by chairing the rules committee, judging, assisting with the logistics, providing commentary, and demonstrating tethered and wireless robots whenever entrants had to skip around during the competition.


1585

AI Magazine

The purpose of the AAAI-2002 Robot Rescue event is to challenge researchers to design useful robotic systems for urban search and rescue (USAR). The competition rules are written to simulate a real rescue response in a simulated disaster environment developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The event comprises a competition and an exhibition. The competition is a low-fidelity simulation meant to encourage participants to contribute to the field of urban search and rescue (USAR) robotics and make them aware of the AI and engineering research challenges encountered when working within the USAR field (Casper et al. 2001). Competitors are challenged to quickly locate as many victims as possible within constraints, which provide the competitor with a sense of what a real USAR situation involves.


The AAAI-2002 Robot Rescue

AI Magazine

The purpose of the AAAI-2002 Robot Rescue event is to challenge researchers to design useful robotic systems for urban search and rescue (USAR). The competition rules are written to simulate a real rescue response in a simulated disaster environment developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This article provides an overview of the current state of the art for USAR robotics, an overview of the AAAI-2002 Robot Rescue event, and a discussion of the future of the Robot Rescue event.