AI Technologies for Homeland Security

AI Magazine

The American Association for Artificial Intelligence presented its 2005 Spring Symposium Series on Monday through Wednesday, March 21-23, 2005 at Stanford University in Stanford, California. The topics of the eight symposia in this symposium series were (1) AI Technologies for Homeland Security; (2) Challenges to Decision Support in a Changing World; (3) Developmental Robotics; (4) Dialogical Robots: Verbal Interaction with Embodied Agents and Situated Devices; (5) Knowledge Collection from Volunteer Contributors; (6) Metacognition in Computation; (7) Persistent Assistants: Living and Working with AI; and (8) Reasoning with Mental and External Diagrams: Computational Modeling and Spatial Assistance. Michael L. Anderson, Thomas Barkowsky, Pauline Berry, Douglas Blank, Timothy Chklovski, Pedro Domingos, Marek J. Druzdzel, Christian Freksa, John Gersh, Mary Hegarty, Tze-Yun Leong, Henry Lieberman, Ric Lowe, Susann Luperfoy, Rada Mihalcea, Lisa Meeden, David P. Miller, Tim Oates, Robert Popp, Daniel Shapiro, Nathan Schurr, Push Singh, and John Yen An informal reception was held on Monday, March 21. A general plenary session, in which the highlights of each symposium were presented, was held on Tuesday, March 22. Symposia were limited to between forty and sixty participants. In the following sections, brief summaries of each symposium are presented by the symposium organizers.


Reports of the AAAI 2010 Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the 2010 Fall Symposium Series, held Thursday through Saturday, November 11-13, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the eight symposia are as follows: (1) Cognitive and Metacognitive Educational Systems; (2) Commonsense Knowledge; (3) Complex Adaptive Systems: Resilience, Robustness, and Evolvability; (4) Computational Models of Narrative; (5) Dialog with Robots; (6) Manifold Learning and Its Applications; (7) Proactive Assistant Agents; and (8) Quantum Informatics for Cognitive, Social, and Semantic Processes. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report. The Cognitive and Metacognitive Educational Systems (MCES) AAAI symposium, held in November 2010, was the second edition of this successful AAAI symposium. The idea for the symposium stemmed from several theoretical, conceptual, empirical, and applied considerations about the role of metacognition and self-regulation when learning with computer-based learning environments (CBLEs). A related goal was the design and implementation issues associated with metacognitive educational systems. MCES implemented as CBLEs are designed to interact with users and support their learning and decision-making processes. A critical component of good decision making is self-regulation. The primary aim of this symposium was to continue the discussion started in 2009 on some of the previous considerations and to enhance the discussions with some new ones: What are the theoretical foundations and how are they articulated in CBLEs? Is it possible to develop a unified framework for all metacognitive educational systems? What are the necessary characteristics of these systems to support metacognition? To what extent does the educational system itself have to exhibit metacognitive behaviors, and how are these behaviors organized and enacted to support learning? What are the main aspects of metacognition, self-regulation skills, emotions, and motivations that influence the learning process? What does it mean to be metacognitive, and how can one learn to be metacognitive? Can MCES actually foster learners to be self-regulating agents? How can an MCES be autonomous and increase its knowledge to match the learners' evolving skills and knowledge?


Reports of the AAAI 2010 Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the 2010 Fall Symposium Series, held Thursday through Saturday, November 11-13, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the eight symposia are as follows: (1) Cognitive and Metacognitive Educational Systems; (2) Commonsense Knowledge; (3) Complex Adaptive Systems: Resilience, Robustness, and Evolvability; (4) Computational Models of Narrative; (5) Dialog with Robots; (6) Manifold Learning and Its Applications; (7) Proactive Assistant Agents ; and (8) Quantum Informatics for Cognitive, Social, and Semantic Processes. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.


Reports of the AAAI 2009 Spring Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, was pleased to present the 2009 Spring Symposium Series, held Monday through Wednesday, March 23–25, 2009 at Stanford University. The titles of the nine symposia were Agents that Learn from Human Teachers, Benchmarking of Qualitative Spatial and Temporal Reasoning Systems, Experimental Design for Real-World Systems, Human Behavior Modeling, Intelligent Event Processing, Intelligent Narrative Technologies II, Learning by Reading and Learning to Read, Social Semantic Web: Where Web 2.0 Meets Web 3.0, and Technosocial Predictive Analytics. The goal of the Agents that Learn from Human Teachers was to investigate how we can enable software and robotics agents to learn from real-time interaction with an everyday human partner. The aim of the Benchmarking of Qualitative Spatial and Temporal Reasoning Systems symposium was to initiate the development of a problem repository in the field of qualitative spatial and temporal reasoning and identify a graded set of challenges for future midterm and long-term research. The Experimental Design symposium discussed the challenges of evaluating AI systems. The Human Behavior Modeling symposium explored reasoning methods for understanding various aspects of human behavior, especially in the context of designing intelligent systems that interact with humans. The Intelligent Event Processing symposium discussed the need for more AI-based approaches in event processing and defined a kind of research agenda for the field, coined as intelligent complex event processing (iCEP). The Intelligent Narrative Technologies II AAAI symposium discussed innovations, progress, and novel techniques in the research domain. The Learning by Reading and Learning to Read symposium explored two aspects of making natural language texts semantically accessible to, and processable by, machines. The Social Semantic Web symposium focused on the real-world grand challenges in this area. Finally, the Technosocial Predictive Analytics symposium explored new methods for anticipatory analytical thinking that provide decision advantage through the integration of human and physical models.


Control Mechanisms for Spatial Knowledge Processing in Cognitive / Intelligent Systems

AI Magazine

Reports The 2007 Spring Symposium Series was held Monday through Wednesday, March 26-28, 2007, at Stanford University, California. The titles of the nine symposia in this symposium series were (1) Control Mechanisms for Spatial Knowledge Processing in Cognitive/Intelligent Systems, (2) Game Theoretic and Decision Theoretic Agents, (3) Intentions in Intelligent Systems, (4) Interaction Challenges for Artificial Assistants, (5) Logical Formalizations of Commonsense Reasoning, (6) Machine Reading, (7) Multidisciplinary Collaboration for Socially Assistive Robotics, (8) Quantum Interaction, and (9) Robots and Robot Venues: Resources for AI Education. The purpose of this symposium was to address and investigate the interface and possible interplay between spatial knowledge processing and control processes. The latter refers to all those processes that organize and integrate information, allocate processing resources, and tailor information streams to the current conditions so as to allow for coherent functioning of biological and artificial cognitive systems in their environment. Although both areas have been researched intensely in the past, the question of how they interface has received only little attention.