Goto

Collaborating Authors

Artificial Intelligence in Alzheimer's Applications - 2020 - ResearchAndMarkets.com

#artificialintelligence

DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The "Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Alzheimer's Applications" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering. Artificial intelligence (AI) is a term used to identify a scientific field that covers the creation of machines aimed at reproducing wholly or in part the intelligent behavior of human beings. These machines include computers, sensors, robots, and hypersmart devices. As shown in the figure below, the ultimate purpose of artificial intelligence is to create smart machines that, through the steps of learning, reasoning, and self-correcting, will eventually be able to make decisions, solve problems, and act like human beings.


Herpes viruses in the brain linked to Alzheimer's disease

New Scientist

The most in-depth analysis of human brain tissue ever done in Alzheimer's disease has found evidence for the controversial theory that viruses play a role in the condition. If true, it could mean that some instances of Alzheimer's might be treated with anti-viral drugs. Alzheimer's is the most common cause of dementia, affecting some 47 million people worldwide.


Kris Alzheimer’s misdiagnosis

FOX News

Kris Kristofferson has been battling memory loss for several years, but his condition has taken a marked turn for the better due to a surprising diagnosis. Doctors have been telling Kristofferson that his worsening memory loss was caused either by Alzheimer's or by dementia that was brought on by blows to the head he suffered in his athletic youth, when he took regular part in rough sports including football, boxing and rugby. The iconic singer-songwriter and actor tells Rolling Stone Country that it got so bad, he sometimes couldn't remember what he was doing from one moment to the next. In typical Kristofferson fashion, he began to write a song about it. "I see an empty chair / Someone was sitting there," the lyrics begin.


Alzheimer's Algorithm May Predict Who Gets the Disease

#artificialintelligence

Alzheimer's disease has no cure, but getting a diagnosis as quickly as possible can allow patients to start symptom-delaying drugs. The problem with getting that diagnosis, though, is that the early stages of Alzheimer's can look a lot like mild cognitive impairment, which may or may not progress into Alzheimer's.


?utm_content=bufferfef66&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

#artificialintelligence

Out of the total number, 48 were scans of people with the disease, while 48 were scans of people who suffered from mild cognitive impairment and eventually developed full-blown Alzheimer's. The AI was able to diagnose Alzheimer's 86 percent of the time. More importantly, it was able to detect mild cognitive impairment 84 percent of the time, making it a potentially effective tool for early diagnosis. With more samples and further development, though, the AI could become more accurate until it's reliable enough to be used as a non-invasive early detection system.