Google on track for quantum computer breakthrough by end of 2017

New Scientist

Google is leading the pack when it comes to quantum computing. The company is testing a 20-qubit processor – its most powerful quantum chip yet – and is on target to have a working 49-qubit chip by the end of this year. Qubits, or quantum bits, can be a mixture of 0 and 1 at the same time, making them potentially more powerful than classical bits. And if everything goes to plan, the 49-qubit chip will make Google the first to build a quantum computer capable of solving certain problems that are beyond the abilities of ordinary computers. Google set itself this ambitious goal, known as quantum supremacy, in a paper published last July.


Google is close to a breakthrough in quantum computing

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The world's most powerful quantum computer processor could be created by Google, if research underway at the firm pays off. The company is currently testing a quantum processor more than twice as powerful as its previously announced chip, and claims it will be ready by the end of 2017. If successful, the processor could lead to computers capable of solving scientific mysteries that would take ordinary computers billions of years to compute. Google claims it will have a working quantum chip, powerful enough to out perform conventional computers, by the end of 2017. The heart of modern computing is binary code, which has served computers for decades.


Google's quantum computing plans threatened by IBM curveball

New Scientist

Just when it was looking like the underdog, classical computing is striking back. IBM has come up with a way to simulate quantum computers that have 56 quantum bits, or qubits, on a non-quantum supercomputer – a task previously thought to be impossible. The feat moves the goalposts in the fight for quantum supremacy, the effort to outstrip classical computers using quantum ones. It used to be widely accepted that a classical computer cannot simulate more than 49 qubits because of memory limitations. The memory required for simulations increases exponentially with each additional qubit.


IBM's 56-qubit curveball may hit Google quantum computing plans

New Scientist

Just when it was looking like the underdog, classical computing is striking back. IBM has come up with a way to simulate quantum computers that have 56 quantum bits, or qubits, on a non-quantum supercomputer – a task previously thought to be impossible. The feat moves the goalposts in the fight for quantum supremacy, the effort to outstrip classical computers using quantum ones. It used to be widely accepted that a classical computer cannot simulate more than 49 qubits because of memory limitations. The memory required for simulations increases exponentially with each additional qubit.


Quantum cheques could be a forgery-free way to move money

New Scientist

A quantum upgrade could make old-fashioned cheques the most secure way to send money. Researchers have proven that quantum computers could in theory create and cash cheques that are nearly impossible to forge. Quantum computers store information using qubits which, unlike the ones and zeros of classical computing, can exist in two states simultaneously. This is known as quantum superposition. But it's impossible to observe a qubit while it's in a superposition – it collapses into either a one or zero as soon as you measure it.