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New AI-Based Navigation Helps Loon's Balloons Hover in Place

WIRED

High-flying balloons are bringing broadband connectivity to remote nations and post-disaster zones where cell towers have been knocked out. These "super-pressure" helium-filled polyethylene bags float 65,000 feet up in the stratosphere, above commercial planes, hurricanes, and pretty much anything else. But keeping a fleet of tennis-court-sized, internet-blasting balloons hovering over one spot has been a tricky engineering problem, just like keeping a boat floating in one place on a fast-moving river. Now researchers at Google spinoff Loon have figured out how to use a form of artificial intelligence to allow the balloon's onboard controller to predict wind speed and direction at various heights, then use that information to raise and lower the balloon accordingly. The new AI-powered navigation system opens the possibility of using stationary balloons to monitor animal migrations, the effects of climate change, or illegal cross-border wildlife or human trafficking from a relatively inexpensive platform for months at a time.


Google's AI can keep Loon balloons flying for over 300 days in a row

New Scientist

Huge stratospheric balloons that act as floating cell towers in remote areas can stay in the air for hundreds of days thanks to an artificially intelligent pilot created by Google and Loon. Loon, a subsidiary of Google's parent company Alphabet, produces tennis-court-sized balloons that are filled with helium and sent into the stratosphere. Keeping these huge balloons in a fixed position is difficult as they can get blown off course. Now, researchers at Loon and Google have joined forces to create an AI controller that can counter the harsh winds of the stratosphere by releasing air to descend or adding it to ascend, riding atmospheric currents in the desired direction. The two firms used an AI technique called deep reinforcement learning to train the balloon's controllers.


[R] Autonomous navigation of stratospheric balloons using reinforcement learning -- From Google Loon

#artificialintelligence

Efficiently navigating a superpressure balloon in the stratosphere1 requires the integration of a multitude of cues, such as wind speed and solar elevation, and the process is complicated by forecast errors and sparse wind measurements. Coupled with the need to make decisions in real time, these factors rule out the use of conventional control techniques2,3. Here we describe the use of reinforcement learning4,5 to create a high-performing flight controller. Our algorithm uses data augmentation6,7 and a self-correcting design to overcome the key technical challenge of reinforcement learning from imperfect data, which has proved to be a major obstacle to its application to physical systems8. We deployed our controller to station Loon superpressure balloons at multiple locations across the globe, including a 39-day controlled experiment over the Pacific Ocean.


Alphabet's Loon deploys new AI-powered navigation system to balloon fleet

ZDNet

Loon, the former Google X project and now independent Alphabet company, says it has built and deployed a new AI-powered navigation system that leverages reinforcement learning (RL) to steer balloons more accurately and efficiently through the stratosphere. Developed in cooperation with the Google AI team in Montreal, Loon said the new navigation system is capable of teaching itself how to navigate balloons better than the original balloon navigation system, which was built by human engineers over the last decade. During a head-to-head comparison of the human designed system and the reinforcement learning system, conducted over 39 days above the Pacific Ocean, Loon said the new navigation system kept a balloon over a defined location for longer periods of time while also using less power. The RL system also came up with complex navigational maneuvers that had not seen before. The reinforcement learning system is now live across Loon's fleet of stratospheric internet balloons, which are currently floating above Kenya in eastern Africa.


Alphabet's Loon hands the reins of its internet air balloons to self-learning AI

#artificialintelligence

Alphabet's Loon, the team responsible for beaming internet down to Earth from stratospheric helium balloons, has achieved a new milestone: its navigation system is no longer run by human-designed software. Instead, the company's internet balloons are steered around the globe by an artificial intelligence -- in particular, a set of algorithms both written and executed by a deep reinforcement learning-based flight control system that is more efficient and adept than the older, human-made one. The system is now managing Loon's fleet of balloons over Kenya, where Loon launched its first commercial internet service in July after testing its fleet in a series of disaster relief initiatives and other test environments for much of the last decade. Similar to how researchers have achieved breakthrough AI advances in teaching computers to play sophisticated video games and helping software learn how to manipulate robotic hands in lifelike ways, reinforcement learning is a technique that allows software to teach itself skills through trial and error. Obviously, such repetition is not possible in the real world when dealing with high-altitude balloons that are costly to operate and even more costly to repair in the event they crash.