Cisco and Hyundai promise hyperconnected car for 2019

ZDNet

Networking giant Cisco and motor company Hyundai are working together on high-end'hyperconnected' cars, which they say will launch in 2019.


Outsmarting fraudsters while protecting cardholders

#artificialintelligence

"We serve as the infrastructure for payments for more than 250 banks, 350,000 merchants and 19 million cardholders in the Nordics and Baltics," says Kaspar Kock Kristensen, Senior Vice President of Fraud and Dispute Services at Nets. "It's our responsibility to connect banks, businesses and consumers, and facilitate their digital payments. So it's imperative that we maintain stable, secure operations and protect our clients from fraud." Historically, an internal fraud expert would investigate a transaction flagged as suspicious. But this transaction would already be complete – along with any similar transactions. This means a cardholder could incur significant losses before their card was frozen.


Cybersecurity in a Hyper-Connected Smart City

#artificialintelligence

Municipalities spend $12.8 million to convert street lights Stay up-to-date on the topics you care about. We'll send you an email alert whenever a news article matches your alert term. It's free, and you can add new alerts at any time. We won't share your personal information with anyone.


Cybersecurity in a Hyper-Connected Smart City

#artificialintelligence

In our days we read more stories than ever about the current size of the IoT field. The fact that we can connect any possible device on the Internet and become capable of understanding the context in real time and making decisions based on the most accurate description of the situation opens new eras where we can develop business and opportunities. Smart cities are a constant developing concept. We try to identify the services, the needs should be addressed, the connection, and the interaction people will have with the new smart structure. In order to achieve this, new technologies have to be developed, the structure and infrastructure have to be optimized, the services have to be integrated, and, of course, use the connected devices in the most secure and well-designed way for both the city and the users.


Click Here to Kill Everybody, book review: Meeting the IoT security challenge

ZDNet

Click Here to Kill Everybody: Security and Survival in a Hyper-Connected World • By Bruce Schneier • Norton • 319 pages • ISBN: 978-0-393-60888-5 • £19.99 / $27.95 The Internet of Things is a case in point: today's internet is a mess of security vulnerabilities and coding errors. As the size of data breaches and cost of cyber attacks escalates week by week, now we want to exponentially increase the complexity, attack surface and dangers by wirelessing up billions of ultra-cheap devices, any one of which might bring the whole thing down. Surveying the shape of this monster takes up the first third of Bruce Schneier's latest book, Click Here to Kill Everybody: Security and Survival in a Hyper-Connected World. Anyone who follows security can probably skip most of it, as it's largely familiar material.