Seven adult-sized humanoid robots together for first time in the U.S.

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Each robot is 1.3 meters, or about 4-feet, 3-inches, tall. They are fully actuated, which means that they have similar joints and movement capabilities to that of a human, including arms, legs and hands with fully functional fingers and an opposable thumb. "This is an historic event," said Dr. Youngmoo Kim, an associate professor and assistant dean of media technologies in the College of Engineering and the director of the Music and Entertainment Technology (MET) Lab. "Never before have seven adult-sized, fully actuated humanoids appeared on stage together, so it's truly a milestone in robotics research." This gathering of robots is the fruition of seeds planted in 2008 when Drexel received a five-year grant from the National Science Foundation's Partnership for International Research and Education (PIRE) Program with the goal of training engineers to work in global multi-disciplined design teams.


When a machine takes control

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Robotics and artificial intelligence not only give us means to take care of traditional physical routines, they also vastly expand our intellectual capacity and our capacity related to understanding. Artificial intelligence facilitates a new kind of working life and moulds the hierarchical structure that we are used to operating within. Robotics can be used to replace organisations' middle management, administrative supervisory functions. Artificial intelligence is more efficient than humans in taking care of rotas, performance assessments and routine employee guidance. Robotics and artificial intelligence not only give us means to take care of traditional physical routines, they also vastly expand our intellectual capacity and our capacity related to understanding.


The AAAI 2011 Robot Exhibition

AI Magazine

In this article we report on the exhibits and challenges shown at the AAAI 2011 Robotics Program in San Francisco. The event included a broad demonstration of innovative research at the intersection of robotics and artificial intelligence. Through these multiyear challenge events, our goal has been to focus the research community's energy toward common platforms and common problems to work toward the greater goal of embodied AI. The program has a long tradition of demonstrating innovative research at the intersection of robotics and artificial intelligence. In both the workshop and exhibition portions of the event, we strive to have the robotics program be a venue that pushes the science of embodied AI forward. Over the past few years, a central point of the event has been the discussion of common robot platforms and software, with the primary goal of focusing the research community's energy toward common "challenge" tasks. On the day before the exhibition the participants convened a workshop of 18 short talks. Each track's exhibitors presented a summary of their exhibit. In addition, four guest speakers provided a broader context for all of the exhibitors' efforts. The first guest speaker was the National Science Foundation's Sven Koenig, who highlighted several federal programs that support projects in embodied intelligence. Koenig also provided insights into some of these program's specific priorities, such as international collaborations and educational engagement. Guest speakers from Willow Garage and Bosch presented cutting-edge work with the PR2, Willow's mobile two-arm manipulator platform. Bosch detailed its Remote Lab, which provides researchers anywhere with full access to the sensing and mobile manipulation capabilities of a PR2. Willow Garage featured some of its most recent work, in which point clouds (Anderson et al. 2011) are parsed not only to build generic three-dimensional scene models but also task-specific structures such as cabinet and drawer handles. Those structures, in turn, seed the automatic creation of task sequences for object retrieval in unconstrained human environments. Nataniel Dukan of Nao Robotics presented the workshop's final guest talk, a broad overview of humanoid robotics's current resources, along with a compelling vision for where those technologies will be in the next three to five years. Without providing specifics of Aldebaran's unannounced plans, Dukan hinted that the actuation and sensing needed for com-


The AAAI 2011 Robot Exhibition

AI Magazine

In this article we report on the exhibits and challenges shown at the AAAI 2011 Robotics Program in San Francisco. The event included a broad demonstration of innovative research at the intersection of robotics and artificial intelligence. Through these multi-year challenge events, our goal has been to focus the research community’s energy toward common platforms and common problems to work toward the greater goal of embodied AI.


6 Ways Machine Learning Can Help with Security - Security Boulevard

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If you were to believe all the marketing buzz about machine learning, you would think it the answer to all security teams' prayers. Even so, machine learning is pretty powerful tech and there are places it can be helpful to your security measures right now. Here are six of them. Behavioral analytics are very helpful in sorting routine behaviors and work patterns from activities that may indicate either a tendency toward bad behavior on the job or an insider threat in progress. Machine learning coupled with behavioral analytics and associated data means the machine can recognize nuanced behaviors even earlier than behavioral analytics and experienced security personnel alone could.