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The Naive Physics Perplex

AI Magazine

"Common sense is a wild thing, savage, and beyond rules." The "Naive Physics Manifesto" of Pat Hayes (1978) proposes a large-scale project to develop a formal theory encompassing the entire knowledge of physics of naive reasoners, expressed in a declarative symbolic form. The theory is organized in clusters of closely interconnected concepts and axioms. More recent work on the representation of commonsense physical knowledge has followed a somewhat different methodology. The goal has been to develop a competence theory powerful enough to justify commonsense physical inferences, and the research is organized in microworlds, each microworld covering a small range of physical phenomena.


Naive Physics Perplex

AI Magazine

The "Naive Physics Manifesto" of Pat Hayes (1978) proposes a large-scale project to develop a formal theory encompassing the entire knowledge of physics of naive reasoners, expressed in a declarative symbolic form. The theory is organized in clusters of closely interconnected concepts and axioms. More recent work on the representation of commonsense physical knowledge has followed a somewhat different methodology. The goal has been to develop a competence theory powerful enough to justify commonsense physical inferences, and the research is organized in microworlds, each microworld covering a small range of physical phenomena. In this article, I compare the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches.


On John McCarthy's 80th Birthday, in Honor of His Contributions

AI Magazine

John McCarthy's contributions to computer science and artificial intelligence are legendary. He invented Lisp, made substantial contributions to early work in timesharing and the theory of computation, and was one of the founders of artificial intelligence and knowledge representation. This article, written in honor of McCarthy's 80th birthday, presents a brief biography, an overview of the major themes of his research, and a discussion of several of his major papers. It was not his dream of an intelligent computer that was unique, or even first: Alan Turing (Turing 1950) had envisioned a computer that could converse intelligently with humans back in 1950; by the mid 1950s, there were several researchers (including Herbert Simon, Allen Newell, Oliver Selfridge, and Marvin Minsky) working in what would be called artificial intelligence. What distinguished McCarthy's plan was his emphasis on using mathematical logic both as a language for representing the knowledge that an intelligent machine should have and as a means for reasoning with that knowledge.


On John McCarthy's 80th Birthday, in Honor of His Contributions

AI Magazine

John McCarthy's contributions to computer science and artificial intelligence are legendary. He invented Lisp, made substantial contributions to early work in timesharing and the theory of computation, and was one of the founders of artificial intelligence and knowledge representation. This article, written in honor of McCarthy's 80th birthday, presents a brief biography, an overview of the major themes of his research, and a discussion of several of his major papers.


AAAI90-081.pdf

AAAI Conferences

This paper presents a formal theory of multiple agent nonmonotonic reasoning. We introduce the subject of multiple agent nonmonotonic reasoning for inquiry and motivate the field in terms of its applications for conn-nonsense reasoning.