Interaction Point Processes via Infinite Branching Model

AAAI Conferences

Many natural and social phenomena can be modeled by interaction point processes (IPPs) (Diggle et al. 1994), stochastic point processes considering the interaction between points. In this paper, we propose the infinite branching model (IBM), a Bayesian statistical model that can generalize and extend some popular IPPs, e.g., Hawkes process (Hawkes 1971; Hawkes and Oakes 1974). It treats IPP as a mixture of basis point processes with the aid of a distance dependent prior over branching structure that describes the relationship between points. The IBM can estimate point event intensity, interaction mechanism and branching structure simultaneously. A generic Metropolis-within-Gibbs sampling method is also developed for model parameter inference. The experiments on synthetic and real-world data demonstrate the superiority of the IBM.


Simulation and Calibration of a Fully Bayesian Marked Multidimensional Hawkes Process with Dissimilar Decays

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We propose a simulation method for multidimensional Hawkes processes based on superposition theory of point processes. This formulation allows us to design efficient simulations for Hawkes processes with differing exponentially decaying intensities. We demonstrate that inter-arrival times can be decomposed into simpler auxiliary variables that can be sampled directly, giving exact simulation with no approximation. We establish that the auxiliary variables provides information on the parent process for each event time. The algorithm correctness is shown by verifying the simulated intensities with their theoretical moments. A modular inference procedure consisting of Gibbs samplers through the auxiliary variable augmentation and adaptive rejection sampling is presented. Finally, we compare our proposed simulation method against existing methods, and find significant improvement in terms of algorithm speed. Our inference algorithm is used to discover the strengths of mutually excitations in real dark networks.


Fast Estimation of Causal Interactions using Wold Processes

Neural Information Processing Systems

We here focus on the task of learning Granger causality matrices for multivariate point processes. In order to accomplish this task, our work is the first to explore the use of Wold processes. By doing so, we are able to develop asymptotically fast MCMC learning algorithms. With $N$ being the total number of events and $K$ the number of processes, our learning algorithm has a $O(N(\,\log(N)\,+\,\log(K)))$ cost per iteration. This is much faster than the $O(N^3\,K^2)$ or $O(K^3)$ for the state of the art. Our approach, called GrangerBusca, is validated on nine datasets. This is an advance in relation to most prior efforts which focus mostly on subsets of the Memetracker data. Regarding accuracy, GrangerBusca is three times more accurate (in Precision@10) than the state of the art for the commonly explored subsets Memetracker. Due to GrangerBusca's much lower training complexity, our approach is the only one able to train models for larger, full, sets of data.


Fast Estimation of Causal Interactions using Wold Processes

Neural Information Processing Systems

We here focus on the task of learning Granger causality matrices for multivariate point processes. In order to accomplish this task, our work is the first to explore the use of Wold processes. By doing so, we are able to develop asymptotically fast MCMC learning algorithms. With $N$ being the total number of events and $K$ the number of processes, our learning algorithm has a $O(N(\,\log(N)\,+\,\log(K)))$ cost per iteration. This is much faster than the $O(N^3\,K^2)$ or $O(K^3)$ for the state of the art. Our approach, called GrangerBusca, is validated on nine datasets. This is an advance in relation to most prior efforts which focus mostly on subsets of the Memetracker data. Regarding accuracy, GrangerBusca is three times more accurate (in Precision@10) than the state of the art for the commonly explored subsets Memetracker. Due to GrangerBusca's much lower training complexity, our approach is the only one able to train models for larger, full, sets of data.


A Tutorial on Hawkes Processes for Events in Social Media

arXiv.org Machine Learning

This chapter provides an accessible introduction for point processes, and especially Hawkes processes, for modeling discrete, inter-dependent events over continuous time. We start by reviewing the definitions and the key concepts in point processes. We then introduce the Hawkes process, its event intensity function, as well as schemes for event simulation and parameter estimation. We also describe a practical example drawn from social media data - we show how to model retweet cascades using a Hawkes self-exciting process. We presents a design of the memory kernel, and results on estimating parameters and predicting popularity. The code and sample event data are available as an online appendix