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The Real Threat to Business Schools from Artificial Intelligence - Knowledge@Wharton

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) will change the way we learn and work in the near future. Nearly 400 million workers globally will change their occupations in the next 10 years, and business schools are uniquely situated to respond to the shifts coming to the future of work. However, a recent study, "Implications of Artificial Intelligence on Business Schools and Lifelong Learning," shows that business schools remain cautious in adapting management education to address the changing needs of students, workers and organizations, writes Anne Trumbore in this opinion piece. Trumbore, one of the study's coauthors, is senior director of Wharton Online, a strategic digital learning initiative at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. In the past few weeks, COVID 19 has moved hundreds of millions of students around the globe from physical to online classes.


Introducing Artificial Intelligence Training in Medical Education

#artificialintelligence

Global health care expenditure has been projected to grow from US $7.7 trillion in 2017 to US $10 trillion in 2022 at a rate of 5.4% [1]. This translates into health care being an average of 9% of gross domestic product among developed countries [2,3]. Some key global trends that have led to this include tax reform and policy changes in the United States that could impact the expansion of health care access and affordability (Affordable Care Act) [4], implications on the United Kingdom's health care spend based on the decision to leave the European Union [5], population growth and rise in wealth in both China and India [6-8], implementation of socioeconomic policy reform for health care in Russia [9], attempts to make universal health care effective in Argentina [10], massive push for electronic health and telemedicine in Africa [11], and the impact of an unprecedented pace of population aging around the world [12]. From clinicians' perspective there are many important trends that are affecting the way they deliver care of which the growth in medical information is alarming. It took 50 years for medical information to double in 1950. In 1980, it took 7 years. In 2010, it was 3.5 years and is now projected to double in 73 days by 2020 [13].


Using Science Fiction in Teaching Artificial Intelligence

AAAI Conferences

Many factors are blamed for the decreasing enrollments in computer science and engineering programs in the U.S., including the dot-com economic bust and the increase in the use of "offshore" programming labor. One major factor is also the lack of bold new vision and excitement about computer science, which thus results in a view of computer science as a field wedded to routine programming. To address this concern, we have focused on science fiction as a means to generate excitement about Artificial Intelligence, and thus in turn in Computer Science and Engineering. In particular, since the Fall of 2006, we have used science fiction in teaching Artificial Intelligence to undergraduate students at the University of Southern California (USC), in teaching activities ranging from an undergraduate upper division class in computer science to a semester-long freshman seminar for nonengineering students to micro-seminars during the welcome week. As an interdisciplinary team of scholar/instructors, our goal has been to use science fiction not only in motivating students to learn about AI, but also to use science fiction in understanding fundamental issues that arise at the intersection of technology and culture, as well as to provide students with a more creative and well-rounded course that provided a big picture view of computer science. This paper outlines the courses taught using this theme, provides an overview of our classroom teaching techniques in using science fiction, and discusses some of the lectures in more detail as exemplars. We conclude with feedback received, lessons learned and impact on both the computer science students and noncomputer-science (and non-engineering) students. "Science fiction like Star Trek is not only good fun, but serves a serious purpose, that of expanding human imagination" Physicist Stephen Hawking (from (Krauss 1995))


Here's how to not suck at photography

Mashable

Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission. Back in 2013, The Guardian pondered the "death of photography" as an art form as smartphone cameras became ubiquitous. Maybe -- but to be fair, those Instagram filters can only get you so far. It's time to dust off your DSLR or trusty point-and-shoot and enroll in the Hollywood Art Institute Photography Course, a 22-module online class that will improve your photography skills from the very first lesson. Through videos, articles, ebooks, flashcards, quizzes, and more, you'll study a variety of photography techniques used by some of the best in the business.


Learn how to shoot photos like a pro with this $29 online master class

Mashable

From that idyllic first snowfall to awkward family portraits to trays of delicately frosted gingerbread men, few seasons are more photogenic than the holidays. Why, then, are you still relying on your smartphone's undependable camera to capture precious festive moments you'll want to remember for years to come? Close your Instagram app for a hot second and learn professional manual photography from scratch by enrolling in Live Online Academy's month-long Photography Diploma Master Class. SEE ALSO: Google's Night Sight shooting mode for the Pixel 3 is mind-blowing From there, you'll explore essential photography skills such as focusing and utilizing light meters, and discover the uses of various styles to create stunning, effective compositions. Tutorials on shutter speed and aperture combinations are also included, as well as lessons on digital image construction and popular image editing software programs.