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Collaborating Authors

Chen

AAAI Conferences

The problem of automatic extraction of sentiment expressions from informal text, as in microblogs such as tweets is a recent area of investigation. Compared to formal text, such as in product reviews or news articles, one of the key challenges lies in the wide diversity and informal nature of sentiment expressions that cannot be trivially enumerated or captured using predefined lexical patterns. In this work, we present an optimization-based approach to automatically extract sentiment expressions for a given target (e.g., movie, or person) from a corpus of unlabeled tweets. Specifically, we make three contributions: (i) we recognize a diverse and richer set of sentiment-bearing expressions in tweets, including formal and slang words/phrases, not limited to pre-specified syntactic patterns; (ii) instead of associating sentiment with an entire tweet, we assess the target-dependent polarity of each sentiment expression. The polarity of sentiment expression is determined by the nature of its target; (iii) we provide a novel formulation of assigning polarity to a sentiment expression as a constrained optimization problem over the tweet corpus. Experiments conducted on two domains, tweets mentioning movie and person entities, show that our approach improves accuracy in comparison with several baseline methods, and that the improvement becomes more prominent with increasing corpus sizes.


Characterizing Social Relations Via NLP-Based Sentiment Analysis

AAAI Conferences

We investigate and evaluate methods for the characterization of social relations from textual communication context, using e-mail as an example. Social relations are intrinsically characterized by the Cartesian product of weights on various axes (we employ valuation and intensity as examples). The prediction of these characteristics is performed by application of unsupervised learning algorithms on meta-data, communication statistics, and the results of deep linguistic analysis of the message body. Classification of sentiment polarity is chosen as the means of linguistic analysis. We find that prediction accuracy can be improved by introducing limited amounts of additional information.


Expanding Domain Sentiment Lexicon through Double Propagation

AAAI Conferences

In most sentiment analysis applications, the sentiment lexicon plays a key role. However, it is hard, if not impossible, to collect and maintain a universal sentiment lexicon for all application domains because different words may be used in different domains. The main existing technique extracts such sentiment words from a large domain corpus based on different conjunctions and the idea of sentiment coherency in a sentence. In this paper, we propose a novel propagation approach that exploits the relations between sentiment words and topics or product features that the sentiment words modify, and also sentiment words and product features themselves to extract new sentiment words. As the method propagates information through both sentiment words and features, we call it double propagation. The extraction rules are designed based on relations described in dependency trees. A new method is also proposed to assign polarities to newly discovered sentiment words in a domain. Experimental results show that our approach is able to extract a large number of new sentiment words. The polarity assignment method is also effective.


Yoshida

AAAI Conferences

Sentiment analysis is the task of determining the attitude (positive or negative) of documents. While the polarity of words in the documents is informative for this task, polarity of some words cannot be determined without domain knowledge. Detecting word polarity thus poses a challenge for multiple-domain sentiment analysis. Previous approaches tackle this problem with transfer learning techniques, but they cannot handle multiple source domains and multiple target domains. This paper proposes a novel Bayesian probabilistic model to handle multiple source and multiple target domains.


Sentiment Analysis with Global Topics and Local Dependency

AAAI Conferences

With the development of Web 2.0, sentiment analysis has now become a popular research problem to tackle. Recently, topic models have been introduced for the simultaneous analysis for topics and the sentiment in a document. These studies, which jointly model topic and sentiment, take the advantage of the relationship between topics and sentiment, and are shown to be superior to traditional sentiment analysis tools. However, most of them make the assumption that, given the parameters, the sentiments of the words in the document are all independent. In our observation, in contrast, sentiments are expressed in a coherent way. The local conjunctive words, such as “and” or “but”, are often indicative of sentiment transitions. In this paper, we propose a major departure from the previous approaches by making two linked contributions. First, we assume that the sentiments are related to the topic in the document, and put forward a joint sentiment and topic model, i.e. Sentiment-LDA. Second, we observe that sentiments are dependent on local context. Thus, we further extend the Sentiment-LDA model to Dependency-Sentiment-LDA model by relaxing the sentiment independent assumption in Sentiment-LDA. The sentiments of words are viewed as a Markov chain in Dependency-Sentiment-LDA. Through experiments, we show that exploiting the sentiment dependency is clearly advantageous, and that the Dependency-Sentiment-LDA is an effective approach for sentiment analysis.