Sentiment Analysis Using Dependency Trees and Named-Entities

AAAI Conferences

There is an increasing interest for valence and emotion sensing using a variety of signals. Text, as a communication channel, gathers a substantial amount of interest for recognizing its underlying sentiment (valence or polarity), affect or emotion (e.g. happy, sadness). We consider recognizing the valence of a sentence as a prior task to emotion sensing. In this article, we discuss our approach to classify sentences in terms of emotional valence. Our supervised system performs syntactic and semantic analysis for feature extraction. It processes the interactions between words in sentences by using dependency parse trees, and it can decide the current polarity of named-entities based on on-the-fly topic modeling. We compared 3 rule-based approaches and two supervised approaches (i.e. Naive Bayes and Maximum Entropy). We trained and tested our system using the SemEval-2007 affective text dataset, which contains news headlines extracted from news websites. Our results show that our systems outperform the systems demonstrated in SemEval-2007.


Sentiment Classification Using the Meaning of Words

AAAI Conferences

Sentiment Classification (SC) is about assigning a positive, negative or neutral label to a piece of text based on its overall opinion. This paper describes our in-progress work on extracting the meaning of words for SC. In particular, we investigate the utility of sense-level polarity information for SC. We first show that methods based on common classification features are not robust and their performance varies widely across different domains. We then show that sense-level polarity information features can significantly improve the performance of SC. We use datasets in different domains to study the robustness of the designated features. Our preliminary results show that the most common sense of the words result in the most robust results across different domains. In addition our observation shows that the sense-level polarity information is useful for producing a set of high-quality seed words which can be used for further improvement of SC task.


A Simple Approach to Multilingual Polarity Classification in Twitter

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Recently, sentiment analysis has received a lot of attention due to the interest in mining opinions of social media users. Sentiment analysis consists in determining the polarity of a given text, i.e., its degree of positiveness or negativeness. Traditionally, Sentiment Analysis algorithms have been tailored to a specific language given the complexity of having a number of lexical variations and errors introduced by the people generating content. In this contribution, our aim is to provide a simple to implement and easy to use multilingual framework, that can serve as a baseline for sentiment analysis contests, and as starting point to build new sentiment analysis systems. We compare our approach in eight different languages, three of them have important international contests, namely, SemEval (English), TASS (Spanish), and SENTIPOLC (Italian). Within the competitions our approach reaches from medium to high positions in the rankings; whereas in the remaining languages our approach outperforms the reported results.


Weakly Supervised Induction of Affective Events by Optimizing Semantic Consistency

AAAI Conferences

To understand narrative text, we must comprehend how people are affected by the events that they experience. For example, readers understand that graduating from college is a positive event (achievement) but being fired from one's job is a negative event (problem). NLP researchers have developed effective tools for recognizing explicit sentiments, but affective events are more difficult to recognize because the polarity is often implicit and can depend on both a predicate and its arguments. Our research investigates the prevalence of affective events in a personal story corpus, and introduces a weakly supervised method for large scale induction of affective events. We present an iterative learning framework that constructs a graph with nodes representing events and initializes their affective polarities with sentiment analysis tools as weak supervision. The events are then linked based on three types of semantic relations: (1) semantic similarity, (2) semantic opposition, and (3) shared components. The learning algorithm iteratively refines the polarity values by optimizing semantic consistency across all events in the graph. Our model learns over 100,000 affective events and identifies their polarities more accurately than other methods.


Expanding Domain Sentiment Lexicon through Double Propagation

AAAI Conferences

In most sentiment analysis applications, the sentiment lexicon plays a key role. However, it is hard, if not impossible, to collect and maintain a universal sentiment lexicon for all application domains because different words may be used in different domains. The main existing technique extracts such sentiment words from a large domain corpus based on different conjunctions and the idea of sentiment coherency in a sentence. In this paper, we propose a novel propagation approach that exploits the relations between sentiment words and topics or product features that the sentiment words modify, and also sentiment words and product features themselves to extract new sentiment words. As the method propagates information through both sentiment words and features, we call it double propagation. The extraction rules are designed based on relations described in dependency trees. A new method is also proposed to assign polarities to newly discovered sentiment words in a domain. Experimental results show that our approach is able to extract a large number of new sentiment words. The polarity assignment method is also effective.