Goto

Collaborating Authors

Yoshida

AAAI Conferences

Sentiment analysis is the task of determining the attitude (positive or negative) of documents. While the polarity of words in the documents is informative for this task, polarity of some words cannot be determined without domain knowledge. Detecting word polarity thus poses a challenge for multiple-domain sentiment analysis. Previous approaches tackle this problem with transfer learning techniques, but they cannot handle multiple source domains and multiple target domains. This paper proposes a novel Bayesian probabilistic model to handle multiple source and multiple target domains.


Weakly Supervised Induction of Affective Events by Optimizing Semantic Consistency

AAAI Conferences

To understand narrative text, we must comprehend how people are affected by the events that they experience. For example, readers understand that graduating from college is a positive event (achievement) but being fired from one's job is a negative event (problem). NLP researchers have developed effective tools for recognizing explicit sentiments, but affective events are more difficult to recognize because the polarity is often implicit and can depend on both a predicate and its arguments. Our research investigates the prevalence of affective events in a personal story corpus, and introduces a weakly supervised method for large scale induction of affective events. We present an iterative learning framework that constructs a graph with nodes representing events and initializes their affective polarities with sentiment analysis tools as weak supervision. The events are then linked based on three types of semantic relations: (1) semantic similarity, (2) semantic opposition, and (3) shared components. The learning algorithm iteratively refines the polarity values by optimizing semantic consistency across all events in the graph. Our model learns over 100,000 affective events and identifies their polarities more accurately than other methods.


Breaking the News: First Impressions Matter on Online News

AAAI Conferences

A growing number of people are changing the way they consume news, replacing the traditional physical newspapers and magazines by their virtual online versions or/and weblogs. The interactivity and immediacy present in online news are changing the way news are being produced and exposed by media corporations. News websites have to create effective strategies to catch people’s attention and attract their clicks. In this paper we investigate possible strategies used by online news corporations in the design of their news headlines. We analyze the content of 69,907 headlines produced by four major global media corporations during a minimum of eight consecutive months in 2014. In order to discover strategies that could be used to attract clicks, we extracted features from the text of the news headlines related to the sentiment polarity of the headline. We discovered that the sentiment of the headline is strongly related to the popularity of the news and also with the dynamics of the posted comments on that particular news.


Extracting Diverse Sentiment Expressions with Target-Dependent Polarity from Twitter

AAAI Conferences

The problem of automatic extraction of sentiment expressions from informal text, as in microblogs such as tweets is a recent area of investigation. Compared to formal text, such as in product reviews or news articles, one of the key challenges lies in the wide diversity and informal nature of sentiment expressions that cannot be trivially enumerated or captured using predefined lexical patterns. In this work, we present an optimization-based approach to automatically extract sentiment expressions for a given target (e.g., movie, or person) from a corpus of unlabeled tweets. Specifically, we make three contributions: (i) we recognize a diverse and richer set of sentiment-bearing expressions in tweets, including formal and slang words/phrases, not limited to pre-specified syntactic patterns; (ii) instead of associating sentiment with an entire tweet, we assess the target-dependent polarity of each sentiment expression. The polarity of sentiment expression is determined by the nature of its target; (iii) we provide a novel formulation of assigning polarity to a sentiment expression as a constrained optimization problem over the tweet corpus. Experiments conducted on two domains, tweets mentioning movie and person entities, show that our approach improves accuracy in comparison with several baseline methods, and that the improvement becomes more prominent with increasing corpus sizes.


Sentiment Analysis with Global Topics and Local Dependency

AAAI Conferences

With the development of Web 2.0, sentiment analysis has now become a popular research problem to tackle. Recently, topic models have been introduced for the simultaneous analysis for topics and the sentiment in a document. These studies, which jointly model topic and sentiment, take the advantage of the relationship between topics and sentiment, and are shown to be superior to traditional sentiment analysis tools. However, most of them make the assumption that, given the parameters, the sentiments of the words in the document are all independent. In our observation, in contrast, sentiments are expressed in a coherent way. The local conjunctive words, such as “and” or “but”, are often indicative of sentiment transitions. In this paper, we propose a major departure from the previous approaches by making two linked contributions. First, we assume that the sentiments are related to the topic in the document, and put forward a joint sentiment and topic model, i.e. Sentiment-LDA. Second, we observe that sentiments are dependent on local context. Thus, we further extend the Sentiment-LDA model to Dependency-Sentiment-LDA model by relaxing the sentiment independent assumption in Sentiment-LDA. The sentiments of words are viewed as a Markov chain in Dependency-Sentiment-LDA. Through experiments, we show that exploiting the sentiment dependency is clearly advantageous, and that the Dependency-Sentiment-LDA is an effective approach for sentiment analysis.