Joiner

AAAI Conferences

We conducted two studies to examine gender differences in in response to Facebook status updates. The first study surveyed 600 undergraduate students (388 females and 207 males), and analysed males' and females' responses to Facebook status updates. Females were significantly more likely to post a public reply than males, and female public replies also contained higher levels of emotional support. There were no significant gender differences in private replies to Facebook status updates. Males showed significantly higher levels of emotional support in private messages than in public replies.


Ladies First: Analyzing Gender Roles and Behaviors in Pinterest

AAAI Conferences

Online social networks (OSNs) have become popular platforms for people to connect and interact with each other. Among those networks, Pinterest has recently become noteworthy for its growth and promotion of visual over textual content. The purpose of this study is to analyze this image-based network in a gender-sensitive fashion, in order to un- derstand (i) user motivation and usage pattern in the network, (ii) how communications and social interactions happen and (iii) how users describe themselves to others. This work is based on more than 220 million items generated by 683,273 users. We were able to find significant differences w.r.t. all mentioned aspects. We observed that, although the network does not encourage direct social communication, females make more use of lightweight interactions than males. Moreover, females invest more effort in reciprocating social links, are more active and generalist in content generation, and describe themselves using words of affection and positive emotions. Males, on the other hand, are more likely to be specialists and tend to describe themselves in an assertive way. We also observed that each gender has different interests in the network, females tend to make more use of the network's commercial capabilities, while males are more prone to the role of curators of items that reflect their personal taste. It is important to understand gender differences in online social networks, so one can design services and applications that leverage human social interactions and provide more targeted and relevant user experiences.


Self-Censorship on Facebook

AAAI Conferences

We report results from an exploratory analysis examining “last-minute” self-censorship, or content that is filtered after being written, on Facebook. We collected data from 3.9 million users over 17 days and associate self-censorship behavior with features describing users, their social graph, and the interactions between them. Our results indicate that 71% of users exhibited some level of last-minute self-censorship in the time period, and provide specific evidence supporting the theory that a user’s “perceived audience” lies at the heart of the issue: posts are censored more frequently than comments, with status updates and posts directed at groups censored most frequently of all sharing use cases investigated. Furthermore, we find that: people with more boundaries to regulate censor more; males censor more posts than females and censor even more posts with mostly male friends than do females, but censor no more comments than females; people who exercise more control over their audience censor more content; and, users with more politically and age diverse friends censor less, in general.


Center of Attention: How Facebook Users Allocate Attention across Friends

AAAI Conferences

An individual's personal network — their set of social contacts — is a basic object of study in sociology. Studies of personal networks have focused on their size (the number of contacts) and their composition (in terms of categories such as kin and co-workers). Here we propose a new measure for the analysis of personal networks, based on the way in which an individual divides his or her attention across contacts. This allows us to contrast people who focus a large fraction of their interactions on a small set of close friends with people who disperse their attention more widely. Using data from Facebook, we find that this balance of attention is a relatively stable property of an individual over time, and that it displays interesting variation across both different groups of people and different modes of interaction. In particular, activities based on communication involve a much higher focus of attention than activities based simply on observation, and these two types of modalities also exhibit different forms of variation in interaction patterns both within and across groups. Finally, we contrast the amount of attention paid by individuals to their most frequent contacts with the rate of change in the identities of these contacts, providing a measure of churn for this set.


Left-Handed or Right-Handed? A Data-Driven Approach to Analysing Characteristics of Handedness Based on Language Use

AAAI Conferences

Numerous studies have identified differences between left-handed and right-handed people, especially in the fields of psychology and neuroscience. Using a social media setting, this paper presents a data-driven approach to explore whether a person's handedness can be identified given his or her writing, and shows handedness characteristics that can be inferred from language.