CrisisLex: A Lexicon for Collecting and Filtering Microblogged Communications in Crises

AAAI Conferences

Locating timely, useful information during crises and mass emergencies is critical for those forced to make potentially life-altering decisions. As the use of Twitter to broadcast useful information during such situations becomes more widespread, the problem of finding it becomes more difficult. We describe an approach toward improving the recall in the sampling of Twitter communications that can lead to greater situational awareness during crisis situations. First, we create a lexicon of crisis-related terms that frequently appear in relevant messages posted during different types of crisis situations. Next, we demonstrate how we use the lexicon to automatically identify new terms that describe a given crisis. Finally, we explain how to efficiently query Twitter to extract crisis-related messages during emergency events. In our experiments, using a crisis lexicon leads to substantial improvements in terms of recall when added to a set of crisis-specific keywords manually chosen by experts; it also helps to preserve the original distribution of message types.


An Unsupervised Framework of Exploring Events on Twitter: Filtering, Extraction and Categorization

AAAI Conferences

Twitter, as a popular microblogging service, has become a new information channel for users to receive and exchange the mostup-to-date information on current events. However, since there is no control on how users can publish messages on Twitter, finding newsworthy events from Twitter becomes a difficult task like "finding a needle in a haystack". In this paper we propose a general unsupervised framework to explore events from tweets, which consists of a pipeline process of filtering, extraction and categorization. To filter out noisy tweets, the filtering step exploits a lexicon-based approach to separate tweets that are event-related from those that are not. Then, based on these event-related tweets, the structured representations of events are extracted and categorized automatically using an unsupervised Bayesian model without the use of any labelled data. Moreover, the categorized events are assigned with the event type labels without human intervention. The proposed framework has been evaluated on over 60 millions tweets which were collected for one month in December 2010. A precision of 70.49% is achieved in event extraction, outperforming a competitive baseline by nearly 6%. Events are also clustered into coherence groups with the automatically assigned event type label.


Automatic Identification and Presentation of Twitter Content for Planned Events

AAAI Conferences

We demonstrate a system for augmenting information about planned events with Twitter messages, using a set of automatic query building strategies. We present two alternative interfaces to our system, namely, a browser plug-in and a customizable Web interface.


SEEFT: Planned Social Event Discovery and Attribute Extraction by Fusing Twitter and Web Content

AAAI Conferences

Social events comprise some of the most popular topics in social media. Automatically identifying planned social events and extracting structured information, such as event title, date, and location, would enable more effective index, display and search for social events. However, the informal and noisy nature of language used in social media can degrade the quality of event extraction, resulting in broken titles, incorrect or absent attributes - making the resulting event databases not suitable for realistic applications. Previous work mostly focused on event identification and categorization in Twitter. Yet, event title extraction, arguably one of the most useful and difficult tasks in this domain, has never been investigated. In this paper, we address the task of identifying and extracting structured information (titles, dates, locations) for planned social events, and introduce SEEFT, a social event extraction system, which uses social media content to discover events. To extract the event title and other attributes, SEEFT fuses the original social media content and the content of other Tweets and webpages. Experiments over multiple popular event types and more than a thousand of event instances show that SEEFT significantly outperforms the previous state-of-the-art system in event identification. Moreover, by fusing information from multiple sources, SEEFT is able to extract event titles with high accuracy, providing the foundation for practical applications such as event discovery, search, and recommendation.


The Car that Hit The Burning House: Understanding Small Scale Incident Related Information in Microblogs

AAAI Conferences

Microblogs are increasingly gaining attention as an important information source in emergency management. In this case, state-of-the-art has shown that many valuable situational information is shared by citizens and official sources. However, current approaches focus on information shared during large scale incidents, with high amount of publicly available information. In contrast, in this paper, we conduct two studies on every day small scale incidents. First, we propose the first machine learning algorithm to detect three different types of small scale incidents with a precision of 82.2% and 82% recall. Second, we manually classify users contributing situational information about small scale incidents and show that a variety of individual users publish incident related information. Furthermore, we show that those users are reporting faster than official sources